nichepoetryandprose

poetry and prose about place

Posts Tagged ‘poem

abandoned spaces: remnant plants

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On a drive towards the centre of the province, we found the property below to exemplify what happens to the surrounding vegetation when home sites are abandoned.

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On the property, I could see the old home, the roof fallen in, the tin roof rusted on the half that was not shingled. All around were wildflowers, most noticeable, the fireweed. There were also remnants of cultivated plants:

  • lilac
  • rose bushes
  • hops
  • orange day-lilies

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DSCN0503 apple tree.jpg

 

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Street View, Google Earth gives a glimpse of the property back in 2009.

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remnants

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Not meant to sprawl but climb, hops

crouch between grass, fireweed.

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Recline, each five-fingered leaf

with spaces between digits.

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Remnants of pink rose bushes

and an apple tree, apples

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green but plentiful. Lilac

lifts spent and skeletal blooms.

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The two-track road still leads to

back pasture, woodlot beyond.

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Orange day-lilies echo

the rusty reds of tin roof,

the house fallen to decay.

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All my best,

Jane

Written by jane tims

August 6, 2018 at 7:00 am

in the shelter of the covered bridge – through a spider’s web

with 5 comments

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April 4, 2015 ‘web’ Jane Tims

 

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web

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after the rain,

says the spider,

I am purveyor of worlds

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peer through my web

800 raindrops

inverse images

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each a replica

of roof, walls and passageway

joists and beams

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loops of lenses

strands of crossing

binocular bracelets

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built a web to catch

the rain? I don’t think so

but insects never came to call

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so I am content

with captured

covered bridges

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swimmers, girls gone fishing

and the occasional

Chevrolet

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Copyright  2015  Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

April 6, 2015 at 7:04 am

how high the snow?

with 2 comments

Last week, we had our first substantial snow. My husband is happy because he plows driveways with his tractor.  I am happy too because the snow makes everything clean and white.

Both of us wish we knew how much snow will fall this winter.  Even the weather station does not make any attempts to guess the snowfall in the coming months.

However, I enjoy the old ways of prediction … my Dad used to say the snow would be as high as the wasps built their nests.  Last week, while walking one of our trails, my husband found a wasp nest at chest height.  Last year, in 2011, there was a wasp nest in our arbour, at a point just above our heads.  Therefore, we have concluded… this year we will have less snow than last.

By April, I should know if this method works!!!!

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prediction

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had a lengthy meeting

before the Queen OK’d the plan

and started the nest – concise, globular,

paper contract with winter

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she ordered us to work,

to strip wood from

the human house next door,

chew the pulp, publish the bulletin

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takes stacks and layers of paperwork

to predict with certainty

where home will be safe and above

the snows of December

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the secret in fine print,

on paper walls –

light grey from the patio fence

dark grey from the shingles

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Copyright  Jane Tims  2012

Written by jane tims

November 14, 2012 at 7:09 am

a moment of beautiful – November leaves

with 8 comments

the space: the November sky

the beautiful: oak leaves, not yet fallen

The oak is one of the last trees to give up its leaves in autumn.

I love the look of oak leaves against the sky.  Individually, their deeply lobed pattern is striking.  As a group, the leaves make a kind of randomly tatted lace.

These leaves are a frail, ineffective barrier to rain and snow, but to me, they are a statement of defiance against the coming winter.

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password

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my palm

and its splayed fingers

against the glass

defy the cold

demand the secret word

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the way the oaks construct

tattered shelters against

November chill, cling to

their leaves, whisper

misinformation

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Copyright  Jane Tims  2012

Written by jane tims

November 12, 2012 at 7:34 am

tough to follow

with 6 comments

In high school, in Nova Scotia, I belonged to a history club.  We did an interesting project in about 1971, tracing the route of an old stagecoach trail through the woods between Lower Sackville and Fall River.  We were able to follow the road since it had been raised above wet ground.  We also found old culverts still intact.  One of the things we made was a relief map of the area, with the hills built up in plaster and the old road marked in red.  The project created, for me, a lifelong interest in old roads.

old trail obscured by a Bracken understory

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tough to follow

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the old road at the edge

of the hill is tough to follow

no clues, no footprints, no bent twigs

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eventually all familiar ways

grow over

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a layer of bracken

covers the track

like a cloth over biscuits

at the dinner table

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primo-canes of bramble

claw you back

your mother reminding you

to wear your sweater

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better to look up

follow  the ribbon of sky

marked by the absence of branches

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Published as ‘tough to follow’, Canadian Stories 15 (85), June 2012

Copyright  Jane Tims  2012

Written by jane tims

November 9, 2012 at 7:00 am

‘cold’ place names in New Brunswick

with 2 comments

Yesterday morning we woke to a dusting of snow on the roof of the garage and deck table.  I am not too crazy about the perils of driving in bad weather, but I love the look of new snow.

cold day in December 2011

Thinking about new snow reminded me about the several communities in New Brunswick named for adverse or chilly conditions:

Snowdon, York County – perhaps after the family name.

Coldbrook, Saint John County (now part of Saint John) – originally thought to have been called Moosepath, then Three Mile House … renamed Coldbrook in 1889, reason unknown.

Coldstream, Carleton County – first called Rockland, was renamed Coldstream in 1852.

Blowdown, Carleton County – originally called South Richmond, the community was renamed in 1869, after a significant leveling of forest as a result of the Saxby Gale (October 4-5, 1869).

Frosty Hollow, Westmorland County (now part of Sackville)– originally called Mapleburg, the community was renamed in 1927 because the first frost in the Sackville area is said to settle there.

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For information on other community names in New Brunswick, you can use the search feature at the Provincial Archives of New Brunswick  http://archives.gnb.ca/exhibits/communities/.

new snow on car roof

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newfall: words escape me

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the white ephemeral

perhaps frost

the fir boughs divided

the sculptured steel

of a flake of snow

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try again

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paper stencil

on  chocolate cake

powdered sugar

sifted on the rills

of the new plowed field

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again

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sweet in my mouth

the bitter melted in morning sun

white hot on my cheek

the writing lamp

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a lamp to the left

casts no shadow

(the shadow of a pen

or a hand)

(unless you are wrong-handed)

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chimney shadow

on a fresh-snowed roof

or trees on the eastern edge of the road

where the sun cannot warm

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the morning

dusting of ice

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try again

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Published as: ‘newfall: words escape me’,  The Fiddlehead 196: 147, Summer 1998.

Copyright  Jane Tims  2012

Written by jane tims

November 7, 2012 at 7:30 am

gathering eggs

with 6 comments

When we visited my grandfather’s farm in the 1960s, boredom was never a problem.  Every day brought a new discovery or learning.  One of the best activities was to help in the gathering of eggs.

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gathering eggs

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first breath after rooster presses

crowbar under sun catches

dew in the three-angled strawberry leaves

and light pings sapphire,

red, amber, emerald to opening eyes

I see Dandy waiting

black and white counterpoint to rainbow

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he greets me, ignores

the chickens scratching

along random lines, we trek

to the barn together

push the man-door, open the pen

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Diane has promised a gather

of eggs, shows me how

to shoo the hen, part the straw,

roll the egg into my hand,

build the stack in the basket

set each in a three-angled

cradle of eggs

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Dandy watches the rooster

red comb and wattles,

amber neck, iridescent tail

ignores white eggs and chickens

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Previously published as ‘gathering eggs’, Canadian Stories 15 (84), April 2012

Copyright  Jane Tims  2012

Written by jane tims

November 5, 2012 at 7:26 am

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