nichepoetryandprose

poetry and prose about place

Posts Tagged ‘lilac

abandoned spaces: remnant plants

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On a drive towards the centre of the province, we found the property below to exemplify what happens to the surrounding vegetation when home sites are abandoned.

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On the property, I could see the old home, the roof fallen in, the tin roof rusted on the half that was not shingled. All around were wildflowers, most noticeable, the fireweed. There were also remnants of cultivated plants:

  • lilac
  • rose bushes
  • hops
  • orange day-lilies

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Street View, Google Earth gives a glimpse of the property back in 2009.

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remnants

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Not meant to sprawl but climb, hops

crouch between grass, fireweed.

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Recline, each five-fingered leaf

with spaces between digits.

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Remnants of pink rose bushes

and an apple tree, apples

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green but plentiful. Lilac

lifts spent and skeletal blooms.

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The two-track road still leads to

back pasture, woodlot beyond.

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Orange day-lilies echo

the rusty reds of tin roof,

the house fallen to decay.

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All my best,

Jane

Written by jane tims

August 6, 2018 at 7:00 am

in the shelter of the covered bridge – not a hummingbird

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hawkmoth in lilac

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not a humming bird

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Benton Covered Bridge

Eel River #3

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wing blur in the lilac

threshold of the bridge

scent-thick and purple

invisible

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hawkmoth

hummingbird clearwing

Hemaris thysbe

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lilac thryse to lilac thryse

side-slip, hover

nectar thirst

fierce harvest

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For more information on the hummingbird hawkmoth at the Benton Covered Bridge, see https://janetims.com/2015/06/10/in-the-shelter-of-the-covered-bridge-hummingbird-moths/

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Copyright 2016 Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

April 27, 2016 at 7:16 am

in the shelter of the covered bridge – hummingbird hawkmoths

with 6 comments

At one end of the Benton Covered Bridge (Eel River #3) is a large Lilac bush.

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Lilac by the Benton Bridge

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Since I was looking for wild life in the vicinity of the bridge, I was delighted to see what appeared to be bumblebees or hummingbirds busy gathering nectar from the Lilac blossoms.

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moth getting nectar from the flowers – you can see his orangy body and dark antennae

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As we approached, we realised these were not bumblebees or hummingbirds, but a type of ‘hummingbird hawkmoth’.  They behaved like hummingbirds, darting among the flowers, backing up and slipping sideways.  Their transparent wings were a blur, they moved so fast.  Their bodies were striped in gold and black and their bodies were very hairy.

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hummingbird hawkmoth, his wings a blur, gathering nectar

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Although my photographs are not very clear, with help from the New Brunswick Museum staff, I now know these are Hummingbird Clearwing moths (Hemaris thysbe).  Although I listened carefully, I could not hear the sound their wings made, since the rippling of the water in the river was so loud!

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There were hundreds of moths in the Lilac bush.  The hummingbird hawkmoths shared their feast with a group of very nervous Canadian Tiger Swallowtail butterflies (Papilio canadensis).

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The Lilac scent was overwhelming, thick and sweet.  If that scent was a room, it would be a Victorian parlour.  If it was a textile it would be deep-purple satin.  If it was weather, it would be a sultry August evening.  If it was a light, it would be a Moroccan lantern … and so on.

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Copyright 2015 Jane Tims

 

Downderry by the sea 7-6

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my first view of Downderry (image from Street View)

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map showing distance travelled (map from Google Earth)

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Downderry is a charming town, tucked beside the sea …

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houses in Downderry (image from Street View)

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My virtual memories of Downderry will be of stone walls …

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gardens along Downderry street (image from Street View)

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hillside gardens …

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hillside gardens (image from Street View)

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and a charming red brick church …

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Downderry church (image from Street View)

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Best View:  a lilac in front of a white house …

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July 4, 2013 ‘Lilacs, Downderry’ Jane Tims

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and a Horse Chestnut tree beside Downderry Church …

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July 5, 2013 ‘Downderry Church’ Jane Tims

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Then, onward to Seaton and a backward view at Seaton Beach from Looe Hill …

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July 6, 2013 ‘Seaton Beach’ Jane Tims

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Copyright  2013  Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

August 2, 2013 at 7:07 am

along the Cornwall shore 7-1

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After completing my virtual bike journey through central France, I was faced with a decision …. where to go next?  I considered all sorts of places, but the winner has been the setting for some of my favorite literature  … the Cornwall coast of England.

A few minutes with Street View convinced me.  Along the Cornwall coast are the ocean views I love, the rugged shoreline of Daphne du Maurier fame, the hilly countryside of southern England, and numerous opportunities for side trips to see farmsteads, churchyards and ruins.   It was hard to settle on the 26 images that would take me through my first 30 minute virtual bike excursion.  So hard, in fact, I selected 39 images for the first trip!

I decided to begin just west of Plymouth, and I plotted ten, 3 km trips to begin.  Beyond that is a more than 300-km-distance around the entire Cornwall coast.

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Today’s trip took me through the hamlet of Rame, along the Whitsand Bay of the Atlantic Ocean.  The Street View image of the parking lot at Rame’s Head provides a view of 14th century Saint Michael’s chapel on a cone-shaped headland.  The chapel is now derelict and is thought to be the site of a Celtic hermitage …

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St Michael’s chapel is the tiny building on the cone-shaped hill at about 5 o’clock (image from Street View)

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The first part of the trip took me past the Saint Germanus churchyard …

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Saint Germanus churchyard (image from Street View)

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The church was dedicated in 1259, on the site of an older building.  In the church are pews surviving from the 16th century!  Since there is no electricity or gas, services are by candlelight.  I particularly like the lych gate in front of the church since my novel begins with my main character standing under a lych gate to keep dry from the rain.  A lych gate is a covered gate – during a funeral, the body of the deceased person is carried through the lych gate on the way to the church …

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Saint Germanus church in Rame (image from Street View)

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The next part of my trip was along the Military Road.  This road runs along the coast on the high land.  Other, narrower (!) roads run between the small communities closer to the coast.  My guess is, this road was built as a way to patrol the coastline for military purposes …

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Military Road near Rame – Gorse blooming along the road (image from Street View)

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I enjoyed my visit with a herd of horses along the Military Road …

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As I looked back along the road I’d just travelled (virtually), I was so glad I chose this as the next stage of my exercise scheme …

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Best View:  so many to choose from!  I liked a view of lilacs in the yard of a house near Rame …

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July 1, 2013 ‘Lilacs near Rame’ Jane Tims

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Copyright  Jane Tims  2013

Written by jane tims

July 17, 2013 at 7:15 am

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