nichepoetryandprose

poetry and prose about place

Archive for the ‘exploring New Brunswick’ Category

in an orchard

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T. 'apples and branches' May 31 2016 Jane Tims

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orchard

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between apples, twigs and leaves

stems and branches

are glimpses

of sky

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sapphire and cerulean

panes of leaded

transparent

glass

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molten in motions of wind

edges in

malleable

light

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fragile as blades of bent grass

stiffened by frozen

morning

dew

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Copyright   2019   Jane Tims

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All my best,

Jane

Written by jane tims

August 12, 2019 at 7:00 am

fetching water

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C. 'water bucket' October 23, 2018 Jane Tims

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fetching water

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‘Strength in those arms,’

says Mama. ‘Fetch

me a bucket

of cold water

from the well.’

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‘Need one of those

pumps,’ says Papa.

‘Painted iron,

hornbeam handle.’

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‘No need,’ says Thomas.

‘I know how to drop

the bucket

so she fills

the first time.

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‘Echoes lift

from well-stones.

My face down there,

winks on the water.

Strength in these arms.’

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Copyright   2019   Jane Tims

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All my best,

Jane

Written by jane tims

August 9, 2019 at 7:00 am

hauling wood

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D. 'hauling wood' Oct 25, 2018 Jane Tims

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hauling wood

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The draft horse answers

to a click, a shake

of the reins, the squawk

of a blue jay, flushed

from the thicket. Long

tail hairs scatter flies.

Chain rings, loops around

the log, its cut end

a brake, ploughs up duff.

Nostrils flare and hooves

find gain in gather

of leaves, paw for ground.

Lather under tack,

he lowers his head.

Takes the woodlot incline

as though he’s navigated

these hardwoods

all of his life.

~

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Copyright   2019   Jane Tims

~

All my best,

Jane

Written by jane tims

August 7, 2019 at 7:00 am

Canada lilies by the highway

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On a drive to Chipman today we came back via the old Trans Canada (now Highway 105) through Grand Lake Meadows. The Canada lily (also called meadow lily), Lilium canadense, is in bloom. Each plant holds its lily chandelier above the other field vegetation. They are bright orange with dark spots and hang downward.

 

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This seems to be the time of year for lilies. I have three varieties of day-lily in my garden and when one finishes its blooming, another begins.

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All my best,

Jane

Written by jane tims

July 20, 2019 at 7:33 pm

three yellows

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On Sunday, we went for a drive along New Brunswick Route 615, eventually travelling from Mactaquac to Nackawic. A pleasant drive, climbing into the hills of this part of New Brunswick.

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Early into our drive, a theme suggested itself … the yellow flowers of spring. These included the daffodil and the blazing Forsythia (Forsythia sp.) … a deciduous shrub with copious yellow blooms.

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Another yellow flower crowding the edges of almost every ditch, was Tussilago farfara or Coltsfoot.  The flowers have been in bloom a couple of weeks and will soon set their white fluffy seed. After the flowers have faded, the leaves will appear, big green ears seemingly unrelated to the yellow flowers of spring.

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At the foot of a farmer’s field, we saw another yellow flower, usually found in wooded wet areas or in hardwoods. The mottled green and purple leaves are the first identifying feature. Close-up, the nodding yellow flower with its recurved petals and drooping stamens show this is the Dog’s Tooth Violet, or Yellow Trout-lily (Erythronium americanum).

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Today, my yellow tulips are blooming, yet another addition to the yellow flowers of this season.

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All my best,

Jane 

Written by jane tims

May 15, 2019 at 11:11 am

A granite water trough

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One of my favourite drives is Route 102 in southern New Brunswick. It follows the Saint John River and goes through the villages of Hampstead and Evandale. There are many sights along the way, but one of my favourite stops is near Hampstead, at a road-side spring. The spring flows all year long and is distinct from other springs … the water flows cold and clear into a rounded trough carved from granite from a local quarry.

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This trough was made from Spoon Island granite, hollowed out by Andrew Hamilton (1796 – 1882) … The trough is fed from a spring through a hand-bored wooden pipe. The spring is located on his 200 acre homestead.

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For more information on rock quarries in south-western New Brunswick see a thorough paper by Gwen Martin, ‘ The Granite Industry of Southwestern New Brunswick: A Historical Perspective’ http://www2.gnb.ca/content/dam/gnb/Departments/en/pdf/Minerals-Minerales/PG_2013-1.pdf . The paper also describes the complex subject of granite rock, describes the sources of granite for many of New Brunswick’s beautiful buildings and monuments, and includes histories of some of our famous New Brunswick geologists including Loring Bailey (Bailey Hall on the UNB campus) and Abraham Gesner (Gesner Elementary in Oromocto).

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A view of the Saint John River along a section of Route 102 …. our cabin is somewhere among the trees across the river

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All my best,

Jane

Written by jane tims

August 29, 2018 at 7:00 am

abandoned spaces: day-lilies

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The orange day-lily (Hemerocallis fulva) is also called roadside day-lily, outhouse day-lily, wash-house day-lily, ditch day-lily, and railroad day-lily, giving a hint of the spaces where it is found. When gardens containing the orange day-lily are abandoned, the flowers persist and spread on the site, and also escape to live in nearby ditches and fields.

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The day-lily is an herbaceous perennial with an extensive tuberous root. The flowers are borne on a long scape and each flower blooms and lasts only a day. It spreads via stolons and seeds. Although pretty, the orange day-lily is considered an invasive species. Its colonies can out-compete other native species.

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This time of year, orange day-lilies are everywhere in New Brunswick. In the abandoned community of Beaufort, Carleton County, orange day-lilies line the roadside on the way to the former community.

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the road to Beaufort … the long isolated road gives a hint as to why a community in the area was abandoned … a long way to other communities, hard winters with deep snow and few opportunities for young people

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The New Brunswick Archives says:

 … settled in 1879 following the adoption of the Free Grants Act: named for William Beaufort Mills who persuaded the government to give aid to Anglicans burned out in the Saint John Fire of 1877 and encouraged settlement in this area: PO [post office] 1881-1946: in 1898 Beaufort was a community with 1 post office and a population of 100.

Source: https://archives.gnb.ca/Exhibits/Communities/Details.aspx?culture=en-CA&community=232

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Today, there is only one, modern house in the community. But remnants of old gardens in the community still remain. we saw:

many apple trees at the roadside and in overgrown orchards …

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a young crowded stand of Balsam poplar, perhaps the hybrid Balm of Gilead …

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and a flower I have not yet identified … does anyone know what it is?

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Sad to think of the people who lived in Beaufort, planted their gardens and struggled to make their lives there.  But they left their mark, on the communities they moved to and in the plants they left behind, now beautifying the former community.

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All my best,

Jane

Written by jane tims

August 15, 2018 at 7:00 am

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