nichepoetryandprose

poetry and prose about place

Archive for the ‘waterways’ Category

ice-falls in New Brunswick

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An ice-fall along highway #102 in New Brunswick

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One of the sad things about the end of winter is the demise of our ice-falls in New Brunswick. Along the roads, where there are streams intersected by road-cuts, we often have a build-up of ice as it drips from the top of the cut. Some of the ice-falls are spectacular and all are dazzlers in the sun. For more about ice-falls in my blog see here.

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From my reading, I know that ice-falls begin as ‘frazil ice’, a suspension of small ice crystals adhering to soil, rock or vegetation. As meltwater flows over the surface of the frozen ice-fall, new layers are built and a cross-section of the ice will show bands of ice. 

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In New Brunswick, some ice-falls are climbable, and some create caves under the curtain of ice. A famous New Brunswick ice-fall is the Midland Ice Caves near Norton. https://www.explorenb.ca/blog/icecaves

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one warm hand

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icicles seep between

layers of rock frozen

curtains separate

inner room from winter storm

glass barrier between blue

light and sheltered eyes

memory of water flows

along the face of the rock

one warm hand melts ice

consolation, condensation

on the inward glass

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(published as ‘one warm hand’, http://www.janetims.com, March 10, 2012)

Copyright Jane Tims 2018

Written by jane tims

April 13, 2018 at 7:00 am

Pokiok Falls

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Pokiok Stream, about 2011

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On one of our family summer excursions across Canada, my parents stopped along the highway in New Brunswick to see the Pokiok Falls near Nackawick. I remember the white churn of water below me, so steep it looked like the water was falling into a pipe. In 1967 the Mactaquac Dam submerged the falls and now they are only a memory, visible on old post cards and in photo albums.

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For a fictionalized account of the changes resulting from the building of the Mactaquac Dam, read Riel Nason’s excellent coming-of-age book ‘The Town That Drowned‘ (Goose Land Editions, 2011).

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Pokiok Falls

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my mother held me at the railing

to see the Pokiok

plunge

from highway

to river

granite pipe

roiling water

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later, when the dam went in

they moved the churches

to higher ground

so the church bells

wouldn’t gurgle

when they rang

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now the river slips sideways a notch

to fill the round drowning of the falls

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water cannot fall within water

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I cried when I left

I hadn’t seen the pokioks

I said

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Copyright Jane Tims 2018

waterfalls of New Brunswick – a reading by Nicholas Guitard

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On Thursday evening this week, Nicholas Guitard will be reading during our church’s Authors Coffee House. Nicholas Guitard is the author of Waterfalls of New Brunswick (Gooselane, 2009). He is also author of The Lost Wilderness: Rediscovering W.F. Ganong’s New Brunswick (Gooselane, 2015).  Ganong was a famous 19th and 20th century naturalist and geographer who is responsible for much of the understanding of natural history, place names and geography of New Brunswick. You can get copies of these books here and here.

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If you are in the Fredericton area, you would certainly enjoy this reading. There will be photos of some of New Brunswick’s best waterfalls, as well as refreshments and a chance to talk to Nick about his work. Hope to see you there!

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Copyright Jane Tims 2017

spring comes to the Saint John River

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We have waited eagerly for spring here in New Brunswick. With late snow storms and temperatures still in the minus degrees Centigrade, my day lilies are just peeking through the grass at the edge of the snow.

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There is still ice on the river with windrows showing the last snows …

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but the ice is gradually receding, revealing vast strips of blue water …

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Every year, my husband and I watch for our own harbinger of spring …. the return of the Canada geese to the river. We went for a drive last week to find many examples of geese feeding in the bare fields and along the river edges.

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We saw geese in several fields along the way, but our best view was on a side road to one of the river’s many concrete wharves …

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prediction of spring

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necks of geese

are the steep upward

curve of charts showing:

—— longer , brighter days

——- larger areas of meltwater

——— warmer expressions of sun

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Copyright 2017 Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

April 3, 2017 at 7:00 am

an intelligent world of blue

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Yesterday, we went on a drive along the Saint John River from Oromocto to Jemseg. We hoped to see some birds or other wild life. But we didn’t even see a crow!!!!

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However we did see the world painted in a sweet-toned shade of blue … the ice on the river, the long shadows on the meadows and the sky. I was reminded of Douglas Adams and his tribute to hooloovoo ‘blue’.

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A Hooloovoo is a super-intelligent shade of the color blue.

― Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy    

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Copyright Jane Tims 2017

Written by jane tims

March 3, 2017 at 7:57 am

contemplation

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contemplation

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still

as though cast 

in bronze

mounted on rock

she watches

a strider

skate across

the surface

tension of water

ponders

his agility

the soundless stretch

of the meniscus

dimples on the water

thoughts

barely touch

the shallows

faded as the gentle

brush

of patina

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Copyright Jane Tims 2015

Written by jane tims

August 12, 2015 at 7:00 am

crossing the brook

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Of all kinds of waterways, I certainly love a brook the best.

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When I was a child, I spent many summer hours playing in the brook at my mother’s ‘old home place’.  The brook was in a small wooded valley between farms.  The woods around the brook were always cool and shady, especially on a hot summer day.

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Building stone causeways in the brook was one of my favorite pastimes.  I would find flat stones and place them like stepping stones.  Then, once the stones were in place, I would plant them with mosses.

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I haven’t returned to the brook for many years, but I like to think you could still find the grey and green remnants of my causeways at intervals along the brook!

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a brook in south-west New Brunswick with its own stepping stones

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construction of moss and stone

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in the valley between farms

a brook needs crossing

a freshet-proof ford

lattice-work built

of slate, grey stepping

stones, packed and decked with

moss, hydrophilic flourish

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©  Jane Tims  2014

 

Written by jane tims

October 17, 2014 at 3:32 pm

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