nichepoetryandprose

poetry and prose about place

Posts Tagged ‘colour

colour: solemn, sombre

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October in New Brunswick is an explosion of colour. However,  as the red and orange leaves fall, browns and yellows begin to dominate the landscape.

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View of Nerepis marsh looking south. The ferry is crossing the river, barely visible in the mist.

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Colour variety in the marsh grasses.

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Hay-scented fern adds yellows and browns to the ditches.

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solemn, sombre

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walked out to see you

once again as you

lay dying, somber

the soft light, marsh grass

leaning in the rain

autumn colour fades

tones solemn, ochre

of poplar and birch,

straw-pale, hay-scented

fern, Solidago

and tansy, shadows

in the ditch, the heads

of Typha

burst to seed

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Copyright Jane Tims 2019

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Best wishes everyone!

Jane

 

 

Written by jane tims

October 19, 2019 at 7:00 am

Posted in natural history

Tagged with , , , , , , ,

red, red, red

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October and autumn are upon us. I took a walk around our yard this morning and although my camera was not behaving (I bear no responsibility), I can show you some of the ‘reds’ I saw.

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the red of maple leaves turning colour (I always think they look like stained glass) …

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the red of the berries on our rose bush …

the red of the berries of lily-of-the-valley …

the red of the tiny apples in our flowering crab …

the red of the Virginia Creeper leaves …

Copyright  Jane Tims 2017

Written by jane tims

October 2, 2017 at 11:40 am

colour of spring – a palette of twigs

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The season is rushing on! Only a week ago the branches were bare of growth and today our red maples have blossomed.

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On a recent drive to our cabin, there was still snow in some ditches. But I was thrilled to see the diversity displayed by young woody shoots and saplings.

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Green of willow …

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Red of dogwood …

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And the silver of pussy willow …

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Happy spring at last!!!!!

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Copyright Jane Tims 2107

Written by jane tims

May 3, 2017 at 7:34 am

green flame

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In the afternoon, on a sunny day, the light from the stained glass window in our stairwell finds a place on the wall of our living room. For a few moments, blues, reds and greens create a gorgeous splash of colour. Yesterday afternoon, the spotlight settled behind the curtained door to the library. And a green flame shimmered among the folds of fabric, a reminder of the greenery slumbering out in the yard, beneath the snow.
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Copyright 2014 Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

December 10, 2014 at 7:15 am

harvesting colour … colour of the harvest

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On our weekend drive from Canterbury to McAdam, I saw another aspect of the ‘harvesting colour’ theme.  Anywhere you travel in New Brunswick, you usually come across wood harvesting activity and Highway 630 was no exception.  About half way along, a turn in the road brought us to a large forest harvest.

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forest harvesting operation

forest harvesting operation

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The wood from the cut was stacked into gigantic walls.

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wall of cut wood

wall of cut wood

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The clearcut laid the land quite bare.  It will be many years before this area returns to the hardwood habitat typical of the area, if at all.

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spruce and fir

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The wood from the cutting had been piled according to species.  The colours of the cut wood were quite distinctive.  The largest colour contrast was between the pale almost white, ash …

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ash

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ash

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and the very orange wood of the  spruce and fir …

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spruce and fir

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I have no particular point to make, except to honour the very individual characteristics of these trees.

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Copyright  2014  Jane Tims

 

Written by jane tims

June 23, 2014 at 8:57 am

harvesting colour – memorable colour

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I am starting to think about some of the colours I hope to capture in my dyeing projects.  In my reading I have discovered that plant colours come from three groups of plant pigments:

  • the porphyrins – includes chlorophyll, the green pigment in plants that enables photosynthesis to occur
  • the carotenoids – includes the yellows of carrots and the red lycopene of tomatoes
  • the flavonoids – the yellows of flower petals and the red, blue and purple anthocyanins of strawberries and blueberries

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In my poems, I want to portray these colours with words.  A quick look in the thesaurus shows how many words we have for the various colours:

  • green: emerald, sage, verdigris, malachite, beryl, aquamarine, chartreuse, lime, olive …
  • yellow: ivory, lemon, saffron, gold, sallow, buff …
  • red: scarlet, carmine, vermillion, crimson, ruby, garnet, maroon, brick, rust …
  • blue: azure, phthalo, cerulean, indigo, sapphire, turquoise, watchet, navy, teal …
  • purple: lilac, violet, mauve, magenta, heliotrope, plum, lavender …

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Copyright 2014  Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

March 21, 2014 at 7:06 am

harvesting colour – mordants and modifiers

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Dyeing textiles involves more than just the dyestuff.  Simmering cloth in a dye bath may initially produce a beautiful colour, but without help, the colour may fade in sunlight, or over time.

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Mordants:  Mordants are substances that assist the dyeing process by improving the colour-fastness of dyes (to washing and light), and by modifying the strength and quality of colour.  Mordants bond with both dyestuff and fibre so the resulting colour is more permanent.  Mordants include metals such as aluminum, copper and iron.  I have a quantity of a safe mordant, alum (aluminum sulphate) and I may try other mordants as I become more experienced.

Colour modifiers: After a fibre is dyed, colour modifiers can be used to increase the range of colour possibilities.  In some cases this means changing the pH with modifiers such as vinegar.  Modifiers also include after-mordants (additions of copper or iron).  Adding iron as a modifier results in ‘saddening’ of the colour …  for example, a brown obtained from a tannin-rich dye can become almost black.

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My reading about mordents and modifiers made me think about keeping colours vivid in memory.  Perhaps, when we remember a particular scene in full vibrant colour, there is some ‘memory-mordent’ involved !!!  In the poem, the mordants aluminum, copper and iron are there in the coastal environment, strengthening memory …

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Peggy's Cove, Nova Scotia

Peggy’s Cove, Nova Scotia

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colourfast

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how do I explain

the being present

the exquisite memory

the precise phthalo

of ocean, the cobalt

of sky, salt breeze,

viridian horizon

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perhaps some mordant made

this memory strong – aluminum

from my morning tea, copper sulphate

patina from the weathervane

pointed landward

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and the boathouse

mooring, rusted

saddened the colour

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near Torr Bay, Nova Scotia

near Torr Bay, Nova Scotia

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Copyright  2014  Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

March 14, 2014 at 7:25 am

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