nichepoetryandprose

poetry and prose about place

Posts Tagged ‘trees

after a poetry reading

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Why do you go to poetry readings? Is it because you are supporting a writing friend? Because you love poetry? Or because you search for the perfect poetic experience — the memorable reading of an unforgettable poem, expressive words you know you will always be able to summon. Have you ever left a poetry reading feeling renewed, animated, believing in the impossible?

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I attend a lot of readings. I go to support my writing friends. I go because I love words and poetry. I also go because I long for the memorable. Occasionally, I will hear words, phrases, poems to thrill me for the rest of my life.

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I have had many such experiences. I have been privileged to hear Roo Borson read her poem Grey Glove. I have heard Roger Moore read poems from his book Monkey Temple with his stirring Welsh accent.  Years ago I heard a young Irish poet read her poem about a kettle boiling on the stove, and I have never forgotten her words even though I have forgotten her name.

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sun on tree

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after the poetry reading

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Bailey Drive is a steep incline

for an out-of-shape heart

a pause returns the thud in ears

to chest where it needs to be, a moment

to see maples on the Aitken House lawn

animated by wind, as metaphor for adrenaline rush

of words

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as trees send Tesla coil sparks into blue sky

from trunks constrained by building

and sidewalks, to branches and twigs

unfettered, plasma filaments bloom

on fractal paths

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another pulse, trunk to bud-tips

and another, signals up and outward

heart slows and holds in place

lightning throb in continuum of space

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All my best,

Jane

Written by jane tims

October 9, 2018 at 5:08 pm

Arbour Day in New Brunswick – 1888

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In a previous post, I wrote about the importance of trees in the school yard and the celebration of Arbour Day in schools in Nova Scotia during the early 1900s. One room schools in New Brunswick also celebrated Arbour Day.

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The 1888 Annual Report of the Schools of New Brunswick, by the Chief Superintendent of Education, reports on 1888 Arbour Day celebrations in New Brunswick, years before the first official Arbour Day in Ontario, Canada (1906).  The purpose of Arbour Day celebrations in the school was:

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to encourage the improvement and ornamentation of school grounds and thereby of cultivating on the part of pupils habits of neatness and order, and a taste for the beautiful in nature …

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In 1888 New Brunswick schools celebrated Arbour Day on May 18.  In the whole province, students planted 6,571 trees, 650 shrubs and 393 flower beds!

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Scan0014

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Copyright Jane Tims 2016

Written by jane tims

June 20, 2016 at 7:00 am

early schools – Arbour Day

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Trees in the school yard, especially big trees suitable for climbing and swinging, would have been an appreciated feature of the school landscape. On a hot June day, students would have enjoyed the shade under a big tree.

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In the 1940s and 50s, some of these trees may have been planted sixty years before by students learning about abouriculture. By the early 1900s, there were Arbour Day celebrations in Canada when students planted trees at school and elsewhere in the community. The first official Arbour Day in Canada was established in 1906 by Don Clark of Schomberg, Ontario to remember his wife Margaret. 

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cumberland bay school 2

big spruce trees in the yard of the Cumberland Bay School, New Brunswick

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In Nova Scotia, schools celebrated Arbour Day by 1929 and perhaps before. In May and June that year, officials organized the planting of trees and shrubs in the school yard and involved community members and local dignitaries in the events to encourage their interest in the school system. In 1928, the newspaper Halifax Harald offered, province-wide, a $700 prize for school beautification, which would have included the planting of trees  (Jane Norman, Loran Arthur DeWolfe and The Reform of Education in Nova Scotia 1891-1959. Truro, Nova Scotia: Atlantic Early Learning Productions, 1989).

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The idea of planting trees in school yards continues to this day. Trees are important because they:

  • clean our air of pollutants
  • remove carbon dioxide, to reduce the contribution to global warming
  • prevent soil erosion
  • trap water pollutants by directing flow downward
  • provide habitat for birds, bees and squirrels
  • raise property values
  • provide the oxygen we breathe
  • provide shade
  • make great places for climbing and swinging

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June 5 2016 'arbour day' Jane Tims

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Copyright Jane Tims 2016

Written by jane tims

June 13, 2016 at 7:00 am

early schools – the rope swing

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Students in the one room school may have appreciated apple trees growing in the school yard. But there would have been other trees too. A hefty old red maple would have been a good place for a swing. Perhaps a simple rope swing, with a loop over a horizontal tree branch and a big old knot at the end for sitting.

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June 3 2016 'rope swing' Jane Tims

 

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rope swing

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lunch hour

best spent

upside down

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legs wrapped

tight as twist

of hemp

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splayed ends

of the big knot

trail on the ground

follow hair and

dragging fingers

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world tipsy-turned

maple branch – a bridge across the sky

other kids stand on their heads

school house and outhouse

hang from the hill

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Copyright  2016  Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

June 8, 2016 at 7:00 am

trees and more trees (day 3)

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Once I was asked to conduct a bus tour of southern New Brunswick for some visiting city administrators.  I prepared well for the tour and had lots to show and tell them.  I got a laugh for beginning my tour with: ” There’s a tree and there’s a tree and there’s a tree…. ”  All joking aside, New Brunswick has a lot of trees.  A drive almost anywhere means driving through many kilometers of forest or woods.

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8-3

map showing distance travelled (map from Google Earth)

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8-3   January 7, 2014   30 minutes  3.0 km (south of McLeods to McLeods)

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On the third day of my virtual cycling trip in northern New Brunswick, I took a few backroads and, you guessed it – saw lots of trees.  Well I love trees, so that may be one reason New Brunswick, in my opinion, is a great place to call home.

For the most part, we have a mixed wood composition to our forests – both hardwood and softwood.  One thing I’ve noticed in painting my first watercolours of New Brunswick is the dark blue tinge to hills on the horizon.  I think this is due to the large number of conifers (White, Black and Red Spruce, Balsam Fir and White Pine, among other species).

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January 8, 2014  'Route 280 near Dundee'   Jane Tims

January 8, 2014 ‘Route 280 near Dundee’ Jane Tims

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Painting trees is a challenge for me.  My biggest problem is ‘green’ … I use Sap Green and Oxide of Chromium, and mix these with blue and yellow, but I can never seen to capture the emeralds of nature!

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Copyright  2014  Jane Tims

trees on sky

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This time of year, the lost leaves allow a new observation of sky.  The bare branches remind me of pen and ink on paper.

 

these leafless trees / brush against /a linen sky / ink strokes /on rice paper

 (from ‘requesting the favor of a reply’ in the post ‘hidden in the hollow heart of an oak’ August 19, 2011, under shelter)   

 

pale sunrise

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perhaps this sparse oak

colored the pale sunrise

palette, faded autumn

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even loaded, lean branches

lay only brief color

on canvas sky

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brush more suited to calligraphy

a few abbreviated strokes

a terse ‘good morning’

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© Jane Tims 2007

Written by jane tims

October 30, 2011 at 8:23 am

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