nichepoetryandprose

poetry and prose about place

Posts Tagged ‘abandoned spaces

escapes: Virginia creeper

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Virginia creeper, also call woodbine, thicket creeper and, in French vinge vierge, is a climbing vine with adhesive discs. Its leaves are palmately five-fingered and turn bright red in autumn. The plant has small purple fruit, poisonous to eat. The vine is common around abandoned homesteads where it persists or escapes to local woodlands.

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Virginia Creeper Whites Mountain 2 (2016_12_30 00_28_35 UTC).jpg

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Virginia creeper

Parthenocissus quinquefolia (L.) Planch.

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In woods

on Whites Mountain

woodbine

climbs the ash.

Persistent escape

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from homesteads

long-gone.

Thicket creeper

navigates itself

to better ground,

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higher trees.

Thick rhizomes,

adhesive discs.

Five-fingered leaves

spread to cover

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every inch of bark.

Maximize

exposure to sun.

Ancestral creepers

once draped

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zig-zag cedar fences

in autumn scarlet.

Caught the attention

of farmers’ wives

on community rounds.

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October 7, 2013 'Virginia Creeper' Jane Tims

~Virginia Creeper Whites Mountain

All my best,

Jane

Written by jane tims

August 8, 2018 at 7:00 am

abandoned spaces: remnant plants

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On a drive towards the centre of the province, we found the property below to exemplify what happens to the surrounding vegetation when home sites are abandoned.

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DSCN0499.JPG

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On the property, I could see the old home, the roof fallen in, the tin roof rusted on the half that was not shingled. All around were wildflowers, most noticeable, the fireweed. There were also remnants of cultivated plants:

  • lilac
  • rose bushes
  • hops
  • orange day-lilies

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DSCN0503 apple tree.jpg

 

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Street View, Google Earth gives a glimpse of the property back in 2009.

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google Earth 1.jpg

 

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google Earth 2.jpg

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remnants

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Not meant to sprawl but climb, hops

crouch between grass, fireweed.

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Recline, each five-fingered leaf

with spaces between digits.

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Remnants of pink rose bushes

and an apple tree, apples

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green but plentiful. Lilac

lifts spent and skeletal blooms.

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The two-track road still leads to

back pasture, woodlot beyond.

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Orange day-lilies echo

the rusty reds of tin roof,

the house fallen to decay.

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All my best,

Jane

Written by jane tims

August 6, 2018 at 7:00 am

abandoned railroad siding

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Viceroy on rail

Viceroy on rail

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abandoned railroad siding

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a  viceroy butterfly, orange

leaded glass

and rows of wary eyes

naturally suspicious

settles on the slate-grey rail

flexes its wings, nonchalant

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as the black bear who

ambled the track

left a dump

of blackberry seed

undigested pulp

or the enthusiastic jumble of clovers

blooming between the ties

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rails are held between the trill

of insect and the quaver

of goldenrod, caught in the crossfire of sun

light focused through

signal lenses

and glass insulators

on unstrung

telephone poles

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turn toward horizon

rails merge and vanish

altered stride of railroad

walking made confident

by the absence of train

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railway crossing

railway crossing

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railway near Rooth, New Brunswick

railway near Rooth, New Brunswick

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Copyright  2014  Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

July 4, 2014 at 7:42 am

technology and industry along the road 7-17

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My virtual biking has taken a turn for the better.  As a reward to myself for keeping at my biking for 6 months (!), I splurged on an I-Pad.  My son set up wireless in our house and now I can go to my stationary cycle and use Street View directly.  I am using an app called MobiMaps (Brainflash).

Previously, I spent hours downloading images from Street View and transporting them physically on a flash drive to my small computer.  Using the I-Pad is a great time saver.  The I-Pad has also given me the ability to look around the countryside more, so I am biking longer (35 to 50 minutes per session compared to the 30 minutes I was doing).  My goal now is to work up to the recommended 150 minutes per week of exercise.

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7-17 1 journal

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7-17 1 map

map showing distance travelled (map from Google Earth)

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Today’s journey was not particularly photogenic.  The area between Par and Carlyon Bay is very industrial.  I saw lots of evidence of abandoned industrial buildings …

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7-17 c

abandoned chimney with vines (image from Street View)

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One of the abandoned chimneys had a tree growing from the flue opening!

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7-17 d

abandoned industrial space (image from Street View)

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The road also followed the train track and I was treated to the view of a high-speed train going by …

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7-17 h

a passing train (image from Street View)

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Best View:  an abandoned industrial building near Carlyon Bay … not very pretty, but it gave me a chance to practice a different approach to ‘sky’.  The bush of Gorse did not turn out so well, but I like the vine-covered roof of the building and the vine-covered chimney …

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Aug 9, 2013 'abandoned industry, Carlyon Bay'  Jane Tims

Aug 9, 2013 ‘abandoned industry, Carlyon Bay’ Jane Tims

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Copyright  2013   Jane Tims

tough to follow

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In high school, in Nova Scotia, I belonged to a history club.  We did an interesting project in about 1971, tracing the route of an old stagecoach trail through the woods between Lower Sackville and Fall River.  We were able to follow the road since it had been raised above wet ground.  We also found old culverts still intact.  One of the things we made was a relief map of the area, with the hills built up in plaster and the old road marked in red.  The project created, for me, a lifelong interest in old roads.

old trail obscured by a Bracken understory

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tough to follow

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the old road at the edge

of the hill is tough to follow

no clues, no footprints, no bent twigs

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eventually all familiar ways

grow over

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a layer of bracken

covers the track

like a cloth over biscuits

at the dinner table

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primo-canes of bramble

claw you back

your mother reminding you

to wear your sweater

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better to look up

follow  the ribbon of sky

marked by the absence of branches

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Published as ‘tough to follow’, Canadian Stories 15 (85), June 2012

Copyright  Jane Tims  2012

Written by jane tims

November 9, 2012 at 7:00 am

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