nichepoetryandprose

poetry and prose about place

Archive for the ‘edible wild’ Category

checking out the berries

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As I have often written, our cabin is an enjoyable place to be. We read; we go for walks; we watch the birds; we occasionally do a little work (keeping the trails clear, working on the cabin).

This past weekend we identified the trees surrounding the cabin and we were pleased to find we had 13 different trees:

  • horse chestnut
  • red maple
  • mountain birch
  • white birch
  • trembling aspen
  • green ash
  • apple
  • red oak
  • willow
  • white pine
  • black spruce
  • balsam fir
  • shad bush

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The berries on the shad bush are just beginning to form. At this stage they are about as big as a small pea.

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We weren’t the only ones interested in the progress of the shad bush fruit. While we watched, a cedar waxwing landed and stayed for a while.

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Last year we had fun watching the cedar waxwings feeding wild strawberries to one another! If you’d like to see those photos, click here.

Al my best!

Jane

 

Written by jane tims

June 24, 2019 at 9:26 pm

a feast of wild strawberries

with 2 comments

This week at our cabin the wild strawberries are hanging from their stems. When I see them I think of the sweet wild strawberry jam my mom used to make. And, after this weekend, I will think of  cedar waxwings.

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As we sat in the cabin, eating our dinner, we saw a bird making trips between the birch tree in front of the cabin and the grassy field to the side, where the wild strawberries grow.

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My husband identified the bird and spotted where it perched in the tree. The cedar waxwing is one of the common birds at the cabin. They love to eat fruit and we have wild strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, and blueberries on the property.

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There were two cedar waxwings on the branch, sharing a meal of wild strawberries. Sharing fruit is a ritual behavior between male and female cedar waxwings.

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The cedar waxwings nest in our big white pines and sing in the top branches of other nearby trees. I will never see them without thinking of their little feast of berries.

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All my best,

Jane

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Written by jane tims

June 27, 2018 at 7:00 am

spring flowers – service berry bushes

with 4 comments

At this time of year, many ditches and fields in New Brunswick are filled with Serviceberry bushes in bloom. Their delicate white flowers only last a short while but later, in summer, we will be able to pick sweet Serviceberries.

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the shad are running

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after hard rain

and thin wind

between cold front and warm

riverbanks overflow

and for dinner we have fiddleheads

potatoes and shad, served

with last summer’s Serviceberry jam

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Serviceberry bushes are torn fish nets

holes poked through with fingers

white petals scattered over mossy stones

on the river shore

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Published as ‘the shad are running’ in within easy reach, 2016, Chapel Street Editions

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Copyright Jane Tims 2017

walk on the shore

with 2 comments

2015 024_crop

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ignition

Sea-rocket (Cakile edentula Hook.)

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clumps of Sea-rocket

are splashes of lime on sand

missiles from lavender flowers

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pepper to tongue

pungent breath of Cakile

cardamom and caraway

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flavour our laughter

giggles of gulls cross sober sand

intervention in sluggish lives

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launches from Cape Canaveral

moon-walking on the beach

splash-downs in Sargasso Seas

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most days are moth-eaten –

paper cuts, missives, e-mails to answer

problems, resolutions without teeth

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the seawind smooths its sand

begs for someone to take a stick

scratch out a love song

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Copyright 2015  Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

June 17, 2015 at 7:35 am

writing a novel – e-reader editing

with 8 comments

So the poet is writing a novel…

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Title: unknown

Working Title: Saving the Landing Church

Setting: a writers’ retreat, including an abandoned church

Characters: main character a writer; her husband Tom; people from the embedded community including next door neighbors Emma and Mark; people from the commuter community; the aberrant community

Plot: the story of how a woman tries to preserve an abandoned church with unexpected consequences for herself and for the community

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I have finished my first draft!

This week, I am working on edits.

The writer’s discipline of producing something each day suits me most of the time.  I characteristically accomplish enough in three or four hours of work to push back from the computer with a feeling of satisfaction.

Some days, it’s harder to focus.  I find editing particularly hard.  Perhaps because of the recent holidays, perhaps because it is so cold outside, this week I have been having trouble concentrating.

Yesterday, I discovered a way to make the editing easier!

Lately, I’ve been using my e-reader more and more for general reading.  I thought, why not use it to read my own (draft) book?

I didn’t do any fancy work.  I merely took my Word draft and saved it as a .pdf file.  The first time I did this, the font was so tiny, I’d have to use a magnifier to read.  So I experimented a little, and finally settled on the font Times New Roman, size 22, double-spaced.  Once I made the font change in Word, I saved it as a .pdf file and copied it directly into my Kobo e-reader.  There were a couple of glitches which I didn’t bother to fix.  Some words transposed as bold (as you can see in the photo) and none of my italics made it through.  But the book was very readable.

edits with my Kobo e-book

Today and yesterday, I have been editing in luxury.  I have been sitting in my comfy chair, with a warm throw, a cup of tea and my Kobo.  By having my draft in book format, I can see it as a book, read it with more ‘distance’ and more easily find the places I need to re-write or edit.  I keep track of edits, page by page, in pen, on note paper.  Of course, I’ll have to do the final edits at the computer, but that pain is somewhere in the future, made easier by the ‘Find’ feature in Word.

One step closer to completion!!!

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Copyright  Jane Tims  2013

blackberries as big as thimbles

blackberries as big as thimbles

Written by jane tims

January 4, 2013 at 7:09 am

apple tree shadow

with 16 comments

This time of year, I watch for the old apple trees along the road.  Most are neglected, and the fruit remains unpicked, even for cider.  When the apples fall, they lie beneath the tree in a circle of red or yellow, mimicking the shadow of the tree at noon.

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apple shadow

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days follow days

and the apples

fall to the ditch,

claim the gravel

edge the asphalt

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ripe shadow space

at the base of

the leaning tree

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passing cars play

polo and wasps

worry in the

rotting remains

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Copyright  Jane Tims  2012

Written by jane tims

September 24, 2012 at 7:06 am

Highbush Cranberry (Viburnum trilobum Marsh.)

with 4 comments

Like miniature fireworks, bright bunches of the berries of Highbush Cranberry  (Viburnum trilobum Marsh.) burst along our roadsides in late summer.  Highbush Cranberry is also called Cranberry, Pimbina, and in Quebec,  quatres-saisons des bois.

The Highbush Cranberry is a large deciduous shrub, found in cool woods, thickets, shores and slopes.  It has grey bark and dense reddish-brown twigs.  The large lobed leaves are very similar to red maple.

In spring and summer, the white flowers bloom in a cyme or corymb (a flat-topped or convex open flower-cluster).  Most flowers in the cluster are small, but the outermost flowers are large and showy, making the plant attractive for insect pollinators.

The fruit is a drupe, ellipsoid and brightly colored red or orange.  The juicy, acidic fruit has a very similar flavour to cranberry (Vaccinium spp. L.) and is used for jams and jellies.  The preserves are rich in Vitamin C.

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fireworks, quatres-saisons

            (Viburnum trilobum Marsh.)

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against a drawing paper sky

some liberated hand

has sketched fireworks

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remember precursors in spring?

blowsy cymes, white sputter

of a Catherine wheel

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now these berries, ready to pick

bold, spherical outburst

of vermillion sparks

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a pyrotechnic flash of red

strontium detonates

in receptive dark

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a four-season celebration

spring confetti, berries,

fireworks in fall

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cranberry preserves – acidic,

tart blaze of summer sky

winter ignition

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© Jane Tims  2012

© Jane Tims  2012

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