nichepoetryandprose

poetry and prose about place

new place to sit and dream

leave a comment »

We recently replaced an old deck on the back of our house. We have not been able to use the space for years and now we have a place to sit and dream or read, even in the rain! We have another, larger deck, where I also sit when I need a break. But the new deck is more private and covered. For deck furniture we added a locally-made bench bought last year and a small table I made to celebrate cattails! I think I need a pillow with a cattail design for that left corner!

~

DSCN0076.JPG

~

Do you have a place where you can sit outside, even when it is raining?

~

All my best,

Jane

 

Written by jane tims

September 21, 2018 at 7:00 am

curls

with 2 comments

Ordinary things are so beautiful. Here are a few curls I have encountered this week:

~

DSCN0077

curls of wood on our new deck

~

DSCN0971

tendril on my cucumber plants

~

DSCN0080

curl at the end of a plant support

~

All my best,

Jane

Written by jane tims

September 19, 2018 at 7:00 am

have grape vines, will not prune

leave a comment »

I have planted grape vines in quite a few places on our properties over the years.

~

At our cabin, one vine survives, climbing an inch or two each year on an arbor we built. The cabin lot was supposed to be great for growing grapes — a sunny slope, the temperature-modifying lake and breezes to discourage insects.

~

However, the vines have not been thriving. This year for the first time, I have a scrawny bunch of grapes.

~

DSCN0066.JPG

~

The vines at home in our garden do thrive, although the light is scarce. Each year I have a few small bunches of grapes.

~

dscf3002

my grapes, wandering about in the birch tree

~

The vine at the back of the house is amazing. Without pruning, it has climbed high into the maple and fir trees. But an unpruned apple tree keeps the light low. Pruning, that must be the key!

~

DSCN0070.JPG

~

~

Competition

~

Grape vines climb

high into maple.

Feign kudzu.

Burden the balsam,

bend branches.

~

Grape leaves flare,

arrange themselves, nip

every ray.

Mosses and bracken

starved for light.

~

But apple

demands its revenge.

Sends shadows

to starve chlorophyll.

Bullies grape.

~

Teases leaves

with flecks of half-light.

Grapevine sets

no fruit this season.

~

Not a single grape.

~

~

All my best!

Jane

 

 

 

 

Written by jane tims

September 17, 2018 at 7:00 am

New book in the Meniscus Series – Meniscus: Karst Topography

with 2 comments

Only a few days to go before the fifth book in the Meniscus Series is published … October 15, 2018 !

~

Review of Meniscus: Crossing The Churn, first book in the series:

I have never read a book that uses so few words to inspire so much emotion …

only 139 pages long, with each page holding 100 words or less per page … You will be amazed at how potent her words are!

I give this 5 stars for its power, its uniqueness, the fabulous graphics, and a terrific story.

Liza O’Connor, The Multiverses of Liza O’Connor

The Series follows the adventures of a group of Humans on the alien Planet of Meniscus. On Meniscus, Humans live in bondage and are not allowed to build relationships with one another. When a small group escapes the over-lords, they work together to build a new community, battling the elements, local wild life and dangerous aliens. Meniscus is the story of how Humans work to overcome any hardship.

~

walking among the stars crop (2).jpeg

~

Meniscus: Karst Topography

After building a new town at Themble Hill, and thinking they are safe from their Dock-winder over-seers, the Human women of the town are taken by a Prell transport. The Slain return to the town from a supply run to find their women gone. They journey to Prell and use technology to locate the women and intimidation to procure their release. But Odymn is not in Prell and Daniel (one of the Slain) is convinced that she did not survive. Meanwhile, back in Themble Hill, Odymn struggles with her injuries and worries she has lost Daniel forever. Gradually she recovers from her injuries, uses her skill at parkour to recover her strength and mobility and learns more about the strange place they have chosen to settle. Eventually she learns about the rescue mission and determines to follow and find Daniel.

~

cover trial.jpg

~

Meniscus: Karst Topography will be available October 15, 2018. There is still time to catch up on the Series. The books are written as narrative poetry, 10-20,000 words and each a quick read! A love story with lots of action and adventure. Edited by Lee Thompson.

~

Meniscus: Crossing the Churn A woman on a dystopian planet wants freedom and discovers that sometimes fate returns you to where you began; the story of the meeting of Odymn and the Slain, Daniel.

Meniscus: One Point Five – Forty Missing Days  When Daniel is injured, Odymn and a furry Argenop work to return him to health; the story of how Odymn’s past trauma may get in the way of her romance with the Slain.

Meniscus: South from Sintha Daniel tries to right the wrongs he has done and learns he must bear the consequences of his actions; the story of how the Slain returns six of his contracts to their homes.

Meniscus: Winter by the Water-climb A group of people try to build the first human community on a dystopian planet and discover that their former masters have found a way to follow them; story of Odymn and Daniel’s first winter together on Meniscus and how they help six survivors of a transport crash.

Meniscus: The Village at Themble Hill A group of people try to overcome the hardships of living together in the first human community on a dystopian planet; the story of what happens when parkour-loving Odymn breaks a leg.

Meniscus: Karst Topography A group of the Slain go on a mission to rescue the woman of Themble Hill; the story of how Daniel and Odymn deal with separation.

~

All my best

Alexandra (a.k.a. Jane)

Written by jane tims

September 12, 2018 at 7:00 am

imagination

with 2 comments

When I was little, I lived in Alberta, in a house built by my father and mother. At the back of the house was a veranda. Below the veranda was a big vegetable garden, full of corn and pumpkins and mint. At the end of the garden, was a power pole, used by my mother as a clothes pole.

~

Scan_20180830 (4)

my mom and I in the garden … the clothes pole is in the far left of the photo, at the end of the garden

~

On laundry day, my mother hung the wet clothing on a line stretching between the house and the pole. As she hung the laundry, I would play at the end of the garden, under my mother’s watchful eye.

~

But I was not where she supposed me to be. Instead, I was off on some imaginary adventure. One place I would go —  into the cave beneath the rocks around the base of the clothes pole. In my imagination, the cave led to a tunnel, running under the garden and weaving between roots of pumpkin and mint. I don’t remember what I ‘saw’ in the world I entered or any of the adventures I must have had. Imagination can take you anywhere!

~

laundry day

~

mint splashes, fresh

against the wall

~

her mother pins

clothes to the line

~

shirts dance towards

pole at the end

of the garden,

a pole covered

in pumpkin vine

~

where a small girl

skips, turns her chin

towards blue sky

~

where rainbow begins

and ends,

on the green hill,

entry to cave,

hidden from sun

~

and the girl skips

slower, slower

~

follows tunnel

under garden

between tendrils

of ripe pumpkin

and root of mint

~

and above earth,

her mother pins

clothes to the line

~

~

Scan_20180830 (3).jpg

~

All my best,

Jane

Written by jane tims

September 10, 2018 at 2:30 pm

Blackberry picking

with 2 comments

On Monday we drove from our cabin down to the lake (on our newly-mowed road) and picked a bowl of wild blackberries. The brambles were brutal and we came away with several scratches between us. But we picked berries to the tremolo of the loon on the lake and will enjoy a ‘blackberry buckle’ later this week. Blackberry buckle is made by adding sugar and water to the berries and covering with spoonfuls of dumpling mix. The dumplings cook in the steam of the simmering berries.

~

~

~

~

All my best,

Jane

Written by jane tims

September 4, 2018 at 7:23 pm

celebration of a covered bridge 2

with 2 comments

Last Saturday, about thirty people gathered in the Rusagonis Covered Bridge Park to celebrate our beautiful covered bridge (the Patrick Owens Bridge) with readings and stories.

~

Patrick Owens Bridge rainbow

~

We heard from several speakers and readers including:

~

Jeff Carr … Jeff is MLA for New Maryland-Sunbury and candidate for the Progressive Conservative Party in the upcoming provincial election. He recalled the loss this year of the Bell Covered Bridge and some of the frustrating circumstances around that loss.

DSCN0726 (2).JPG

~

Linda Cogswell … Linda is a local historian and reminded us of the history of the Patrick Owens Bridge and the celebration a few years ago of its first hundred years! The original cost of the Patrick Owens Bridge in 1908 was $5,439 !

DSCN0729 (2).JPG

~

Rose Burke … Rose’s reading recalled the loss of the Upper Mills Bridge to fire in 1956 and what it was like to live in a border town in the 1950s. Kids would travel freely across the border, back and forth from Baring, Maine to Upper Mills, New Brunswick, to buy ice-cream or play at one-another’s houses!

DSCN0744 (2).JPG

~

Jenica Atwin … Jenica, a long-time resident of Rusagonis and candidate for the NB Green Party in the upcoming provincial election, read a poem about the way covered bridges affect our daily lives.

DSCN0736 (2).JPG

~

Roger Moore … Roger gave a poignant reading of his poems about our recent flooding in the area and recalled eerie battles with rising water and ruined belongings.

DSCN0740 (2).JPG

~

Neil Sampson … Neil read a poem about the Bell Bridge by Fredericton’s Cultural Laureate, Ian LeTourneau. He also read his own humorous poem about attending a covered bridge gathering after a dental appointment (with ‘covered bridges’).

DSCN0733 (2).JPG

~

and me (Jane Tims) … I read from my poetry book ‘in the shelter of the covered bridge’. The book includes several poems about the Patrick Owens Bridge and the wild life encountered there – deer and groundhogs, blue jays and rabbits.

DSCN0724 (2).JPG

~

Ray Boucher, President of the New Brunswick Covered Bridge Conservation Association, was on hand to chat about the goal of protecting our remaining covered bridges and ask people to sign the petition to ask government to take steps to preserve the bridges.

DSCN0721 (2).JPG

~

The park was perfect for the occasion and many folks said we should continue to use the park for community events.

DSCN0745.JPG

~

A big thanks to Jeff Carr and his team of Kim Smith, Pat and Mac Burns, Bernie Phillips and others who prepared some delicious food for everyone.

DSCN0720.JPG

~

The day was hot and breezy and all those hats were needed in the afternoon sun!!!

DSCN0719.JPG

~

All my best!

Jane

 

 

 

Written by jane tims

August 31, 2018 at 7:00 am

%d bloggers like this: