nichepoetryandprose

poetry and prose about place

bird feeder visitors – personalities

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I put my feeders up late this year, but the birds have found them. So far the diversity is low, but the numbers are high. We have chickadees, goldfinches and nuthatches. I know from my bird diary of other years, redpolls, purple finches and blue jays will come later.

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I spend a little time each day watching the birds. And, as in other years, I am amazed at how different are the  personalities of these birds.

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Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) – sings ‘chick-a-dee-dee-dee’ or ‘fee-bee’ 

  •  the chickadee hoards food, storing food in times of plenty under bits of bark or a patch of lichen. Canada’s Hinterland Who’s Who says a chickadee can remember where it has stored its food up to 28 days.
  • the chickadee is a grab and go kind of feeder. They zoom in on a sunflower seed, pick it and leave.
  • chickadees hang out in flocks, and have a hierarchy and a ‘pecking order’. The birds are very aggressive with other birds, chasing away other chickadees, nuthatches and goldfinches.

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Red-breasted-Nuthatch (Sitta Canadensis) – sings a nasal ‘yank-yank-yank’ over and over

  • the nuthatch walks head-downward after it lands and in Newfoundland is called the ‘upside-down bird’.
  • nuthatches are very solitary at the feeder and are easily chased away by chickadees.
  • they get-their-food-and-get-going, not hanging around even for a second.
  • nuthatches also hoard and hide food.
  • Hinterland Who’s Who says these birds carry tree pitch to build their nests!

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American Goldfinch (Carduelis tristis)  – sings ‘perchickoree’ and flies in a series of hanging loops, potato chip, potato chip.

  • at this time of year goldfinches are dull olive-yellow.
  • they hang out at bird feeders, staying put until they are chased away. They arrive at feeders in flocks and feed quite happily side by side.
  • although they eat sunflower seeds, they seem to prefer thistle seed.
  • Hinterland Who’s Who says goldfinches go into feeding frenzies before snowstorms, putting on significant weight before times when seeds are scarce.

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Do you feed the birds and what kinds of birds come to your feeders? Do they have distinct personalities?

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Copyright 2018 Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

February 20, 2018 at 7:00 am

special book offer – in the shelter of the covered bridge

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To celebrate my reading at Odd Sundays yesterday, I am selling my book in the shelter of the covered bridge (Chapel Street Editions 2017) at the reduced price of $25 (including postage) from February 16, 2018 until February 28, 2018.  If you happen to live in my driving area (within 30 km of Oromocto or Fredericton, New Brunswick), the price for a hand-delivered book is $20.  Just email me at timstims@nbnet.nb.ca and we will arrange for payment and delivery.  

The book usually sells for $28 so this is a great deal if you love poetry, covered bridges or wild life.

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in the shelter of the covered bridge is published by Chapel Street Editions (Woodstock) and includes over 70 poems about visits to 54 of New Brunswick’s covered bridges. The book is illustrated with my pencil drawings and has a foreword by Brian Atkinson, a well-known New Brunswick photographer.

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“… A delightful blend of her poetry and drawings, as well as the natural and cultural history of this province …” Linda Hershey, Moncton Times-Transcript, Nov. 30, 2017, writing about in the shelter of the covered bridge

 

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Copyright 2018 Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

February 19, 2018 at 7:00 am

Reading – Odd Sundays – and a special book offer

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On Sunday February 18 at 2:00 PM I will be one of two featured readers at Odd Sundays in Fredericton. Wayne Curtis, well-known New Brunswick author, is also featured!

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Moores Mills Bridge near Sussex, north entrance, 2015

 

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I will be reading from my new poetry book ‘in the shelter of the covered bridge’ (Chapel Street Editions, 2017). If you love covered bridges, you will enjoy my poems. Each one was written after a visit to a particular covered bridge and the poems feature the plants and animals (and humans) who look to the covered bridge for shelter. Some love stories among the lot, since we will be near to Valentine’s Day! The book features my poems and my pencil drawings of some of the plants and animals I encountered.

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carving inside Moores Mills Bridge near Sussex

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!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

As a special deal associated with this event, you can get a copy of the book (which sells for $28) for $25, postage included. Just email me at timstims@nbnet.nb.ca and we will arrange for payment and delivery.  This offer last from today February 16, 2018 until February 28, 2018.

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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I hope if you are in the Fredericton area, you will come to hear me read. The event is at Corked on Regent Street in downtown Fredericton. Come and enjoy a beverage and the readings. You may win a book in the draw or decide to read your own work in the open mic segment of the program.

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Moores Mills Bridge near Sussex, south entrance, 2015

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Remember to email me and get your own copy of ‘in the shelter of the covered bridge’. Nice gift for someone who loves covered bridges.

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Copyright 2018 Jane Tims

Happy Valentine’s Day

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Among my non-family postcards, I only have two that have Valentine themes. Happy Valentine’s Day everyone!!!!

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sent in 1910 from Bridgewater to Lunenburg (Nova Scotia)

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sent in 1915 from Bramshott Camp, Hants, England to Sussex, New Brunswick

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Copyright 2018 Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

February 14, 2018 at 7:00 am

a quilting project

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Each winter I do three things to stay warm and content:

  1. I drink tea; only a cup a day but it warms me inside
  2. I knit; mostly socks and just to keep up with my voracious need for warm socks
  3. I make lap quilts; I cannot think of a warmer occupation on a cold evening

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My quilting project for this year may seem a little out-of-season. I took all the bits of Christmas fabric I have collected from various projects over the years and put them into a small patchwork lap quilt – just 40″ by 40″.  If my husband and son look closely they will see my husband’s Christmas necktie, little bags for ‘coal’-flavoured candy brought by Santa one year, a pair of Santa-patterned shorts I bought as a joke, remnants of the Santa Cool sock I won one year at work at Christmas and so on. When there was a ribbon or draw-string associated with the remnant, I just incorporated it into the quilt. Perhaps someone will use the coal-sacs for a little treasure.

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not quite complete to the right of the Coal fabric … I will just sew another patch on the bare spot …

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the two amber ribbons are part of a gift bag …

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some of you who used to work with me may remember the year we decorated and I won the Santa Cool stocking in the lower left corner … those were the days!!!

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Today I went to Fabricville and found two pretty Christmas berry-patterned fabrics to use for the back.

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If you have read about my ‘quilting’ before, you will know that my stitches are long and uneven and they look more like basting than quilting. But my little quilts are solid. I keep them on every chair in our living room as another way of keeping the cold away!

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I will show you the final quilt when it is done in a week or so.

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Do you have small remnants of Christmas fabric and do you have a plan for them?

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Copyright 2018 Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

February 12, 2018 at 7:00 am

Meniscus: One Point Five – Forty Missing Days

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Yesterday, a courier knocked at my door and left my box of new books – Meniscus: One Point Five – Forty Missing Days, the new book in the Meniscus Science Fiction Series.

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The first book in the series (Meniscus: Crossing The Churn) describes the meeting between Odymn and the silent Slain and the beginning of their love story. By the second book (Meniscus: South From Sintha), they are committed to one another.  Meniscus: One Point Five tells the story of the forty missing days in Meniscus: Crossing The Churn (between the time when the Slain is shot and the time when he and Odymn release her lock of hair to the wind).

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When the Slain bails on his contract to sell Odymn to the Dock-winders, he is shot trying to escape. Odymn, who loves the Slain, cannot abandon him and recruits Wen-le-gone, an Argenop elder and healer, to help her nurse the Slain back to good health. As they make their way toward the relative safety of the Themble, the trio must forage for food, save Odymn when she encounters a poisonous foe, and get to know and trust one-another. When Wen-le-gone leaves for his home, Odymn decides to stay with the Slain. As they continue on their journey, they work together to survive the dangers of the Themble Wood but in the end, memories of the past may be their biggest obstacle to building a life together.

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You can get Meniscus: One Point Five free of charge on Wattpad here. If searching Wattpad, use @AlexandraJTims  since there are a couple of Alexandra’s listed!

If you would like a free copy of the paperback version (for the price of postage) contact me at timstims@nbnet.nb.ca

The paperback version of Meniscus: One Point Five is also available at https://www.amazon.com/dp/1978407564

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Odymn and the Slain

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Copyright 2018  Jane Tims

 

where we read

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I am a reader. There are stacks of read and unread books wherever you go in my house. There is a Kindle by my living-room chair and a Kobo by my bedside. Since I read multiple books at once, most are marked ‘last-page-read’.  I read the books a bit at a time, choosing whatever I think will suit me on a particular day.

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So where do I read? Anywhere!

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When I was young, I read in my bedroom. I’d take a flashlight to bed and hide under the covers to read. Mom was not fooled! When we went to Nova Scotia for summer vacation, I read in my grandfather’s orchard. There was a tree-limb perfect for sitting!

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During my university days, I read like a mad-woman, as much mystery/romance as I could absorb. I think I wanted solace from my steady diet of science texts and journal articles! My preferred reading place was my car – also a rest from the lab where I did most of my university studies.

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I still favour mysteries, especially detective series. Science fiction too. And poetry, always poetry!

A few series I’d recommend:

Chuck Bowie -“Donovan: Thief for Hire

Ann Cleeves – “Sheltland Island Mysteries

Ann Granger –  I like her older “Fran Varady Crime Novels

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Through the years, I have been constant in my reading spaces:

  • the car … for years I drove to a park on my lunch hour and cheerfully read the time away. When my son was in his early university days, I never minded waiting for him because I could read while I waited.
  • in bed … as the years go by, reading puts me to sleep faster and faster. It sometimes takes me months to read a particular book!
  • in my accustomed chair in the living room … experience with decades of public service work means I can read with any distraction.
  • in our camp at our table. No distractions, just good company.
  • but never in my planned reading space … when I retired I bought a comfy chair and designed a perfect reading corner. It is a great space to store stuff – books for my next signing, the shower head we haven’t yet installed, two throw pillows no-one wants to sit with and recent purchases not put away. When the chair is empty of stuff, it is filled with Zoë. I never read there …. never, ever.

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Where do you read? If you had a special reading spot, do you think you would use it?

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Copyright 2018 Jane Tims

 

 

Written by jane tims

February 8, 2018 at 7:00 am

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