nichepoetryandprose

poetry and prose about place

Archive for September 2013

the colour of September #5 – red rose hips from pink roses

with 8 comments

I have the funniest rose bush in my front yard.

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It bore double yellow roses for the first few years of its life.  Then, in recent years it has become a pink rose, with the frailest pink petals.

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I know how this happened – not ‘alchemy’ at all, but an example of survival of the fittest.  The original yellow rose must have been grafted to the root stock of a common rose.  When the yellow rose stem died for some reason, the pink rose stock flourished.  I love my frail pink roses , especially at this time of year when they produce bright red, elliptical rose hips.

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September 22, 2013  'red rose hips from pink roses'   Jane Tims

September 22, 2013 ‘red rose hips from pink roses’ Jane Tims

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Copyright  2013   Jane Tims   

Written by jane tims

September 30, 2013 at 7:00 am

along a stream 7-26

with 2 comments

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7-26 journal

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7-26 map

map showing distance travelled (map from Google Earth)

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One of the difficulties of a virtual trip using Street View is not getting a full view of some of the streams I cross.  Until you reach the ‘bridge’, the angle is not right to see the water.  When you are on the ‘bridge’, the view is obscured by the blurred curved area in the lower part of the view, a characteristic of the Street View camera.

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Today, however, I caught several glimpses of a stream that followed the road from Manassick Wood to Portholland …

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7-26 stream

stream along the road near Manassick Wood (image from Street View)

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I even had a glimpse of a small waterfall created by a tributary to the stream …

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7-26 waterfall

course of a waterfall … almost dry in this image, but during and after a rain, it must be lovely (image from Street View)

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The best look I had at the stream was after it emerged from the woods to a field of white flowers.  The flowers look a little like Queen Anne’s Lace (Daucus carota), with white, umbrella-shaped flower clusters.  However, these plants look more robust than the rather delicate-looking Queen Anne’s Lace, so I will just call them a species of wild parsnip.

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7-26 brook 2

stream banked by white flowers (image from Street View)

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Best View:  ‘biking’ from the woods into the bright sunshine and seeing the stream meandering toward the sea, banks overflowing with white flowers …

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August 25, 2013  'valley to the sea (Portholland)'  Jane Tims

August 25, 2013 ‘valley to the sea (Portholland)’ Jane Tims

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This is the view that inspired the painting …

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7-26 valley white flowers

valley with stream and white flowers, looking towards Portholland (image from Street View)

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Copyright  2013   Jane Tims

naming the woods 7-25

with 9 comments

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7-25 journal
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7-25 map

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Today’s bike trip took me past the ‘woods’.  Almost any time I ‘bike’ through a wooded area in Cornwall, I find the wood has a name on the map.  I think naming the various acreages of woodland makes them more precious.  Giving a name to the woodland identifies it and acknowledges its right to exist.
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The names of the woodlands in the Caerhays area of Cornwall include: the Forty Acre Wood (reminds me of Winnie the Pooh!); Castle Wood; Kennel Close Wood; and Battery Walk Wood, among others.  Each woodland has its own characteristics and I long to get off my virtual bike and explore some of the woodland plants.

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7-25 Forty Acre Wood

on the right is the Forty Acre Wood (image from Street View)

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I know from my history studies that forests and woodlands are strongly connected to the history of England.  The nobility of post-Conquest England had a special love for the forest and the hunt, and protected park-like settings for the pursuit of wild game.

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In the 12th century, the king protected the woodlands with the Assizes.  These were formal rules governing both the public and officials.  The purpose of the “Assize of the Forest” was to protect the forest and the game living there.   The Assize described rules for conduct in the forest and for use of the land, wood and game.  It also described the roles and responsibilities of those assigned to protect the forest, enforce the laws, and monitor and report on the state of the forest.  The Assize further specified punishments for breaking the rules and for the forest administrators if they failed to meet their responsibilities.

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7-25 Kennel Close Wood

road through Kennel Close Wood (image from Street View)

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The rules of the Assize were designed to ensure the continued use of the forest.

For the King, one value of the forest was as a source of revenue from rents and fines.  Rental income came from pannage (keeping of swine) and agist (pasturing).  Fines were generated from illegal hunting and other uses, purprestures (encroachment such as building within the forest), and assarts (use of the forest clearings).  Wood had value as fuel, or as timber for building boats, bridges, defenses and castles. Other values included the King’s own pleasure in hunting, and the favor he gained from gifts of venison or other wild game, or from granting others the privilege of hunting.

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7-25 Battery Walk Wood

the secluded and cloistered Battery Walk Wood (image from Street View)

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Medieval hunters had various words to describe the different parts of the woodlands.  The ‘chase’, for example, referred to the open woods for hunting of deer, and the ‘warren’ described the unenclosed tracts where other wild game such as pheasant and partridge were hunted.

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three deer among tamarack

three deer among tamarack in New Brunswick

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Best View: shadows on the road … hill on one side and the Forty Acre Wood on the other …
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Sept 6, 2013  'shadows on the road (near Gorran)'   Jane Tims

Sept 6, 2013 ‘shadows on the road (near Gorran)’ Jane Tims

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Copyright 2013 Jane Tims

the color of September #4 – a toasted tomato sandwich

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Of all the produce of September, I think I enjoy tomatoes the most.   I like fried green tomatoes, tomatoes in chili con carne and toasted tomato sandwiches.   If you have never eaten a toasted tomato sandwich, you should try one.  Toast two pieces of whole wheat bread, slice the tomatoes very thin and add mayo, salt and pepper.

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Now that I have finished my watercolor of tomatoes, and they are no longer needed for the still life, I think I’ll have another sandwich …

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September 14, 2013  'tomato red'   Jane Tims

September 14, 2013 ‘tomato red’ Jane Tims

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Copyright  2013  Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

September 23, 2013 at 7:30 am

white sand and phthalo water 7-24

with 6 comments

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7-24 journal

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7-24 map

map showing distance travelled (map from Google Earth)

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I love the salt water, so it is no surprise that my favorite views on my virtual bike trip are those along the coast.  Near Penare, I discovered a spot where a stone house overlooks a sandy beach.  The water was the color of the phthalo blue in my paint box …

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7-24 beach

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Near the beach, where a stream runs across the road, is an interesting ford.  It looks like there was once a bridge at the crossing, but the encroachment of sand and vegetation made it easier to ford the stream.  I would love to know the history of this stream crossing …

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7-24 ford

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Best View:  a house by the sea near Penare, the road lined with crowds of purple flowers (my painting looks quite different from the inspiration, above) …

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Aug 24, 2013 'purple mallow near Penare'  Jane Tims

Aug 24, 2013 ‘purple mallow near Penare’ Jane Tims

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Copyright  2013  Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

September 20, 2013 at 7:10 am

pasture grazers and sea-creatures 7-23

with 6 comments

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7-23 journal

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7-23 map

map showing distance travelled (map from Google Earth)

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On this virtual bike trip, I saw lots of animals – not surprising in an agricultural countryside.

There were sheep grazing beside the road …

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7-23 a sheep

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cattle in a pasture at the top of the cliff …

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7-23 e

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and a man walking his dog along this part of the South West Coast Path …

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7-23 f

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Although I didn’t stop to see any, there must also have been tiny sea creatures to catch in the shallows along the beach.  The beach-side shop in Gorran Haven sells small nets to catch them – I hope there was a note to say ‘please return these creatures to the sea’ …

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7-23 b

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Best View:  the Cornwall coast near Penare …

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Aug 14 'headland near Penare'  Jane Tims

Aug 14 ‘headland near Penare’ Jane Tims

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Copyright  2013   Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

September 18, 2013 at 7:08 am

views of the coast 7-22

with 8 comments

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7-22 journal

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7-22 map

map showing distance travelled (map from Google Earth)

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My bike trip for today took me near the Cornwall coast and showed me how much the English people enjoy their seascapes.

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Mevagissey is a large port town with lots of sailing ships and boats at dock …

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7-22 a

Mevagissey harbour (image from Street View)

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Often, you see either the woods or the coast but not both.  Here, I ‘saw’ a view of both wood and ocean …

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7-22 c

looking towards Mevagissey (image from Street View)

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I liked the Portmellon beach area.  There were walkers and swimmers, kayakers and sailors, all enjoying their bit of the Cornwall coast …

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7-22 d

swimmer at Portmellon beach (image from Street View)

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Best View: the Portmellon coastline – I like the way this turned out … stormy sky, uniform ocean and perspective are all the way I wanted them to be …  it’s fun doing the shadows on the road …

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Aug 7, 2013  'Portmellon coast'   Jane Tims

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Copyright 2013  Jane Tims

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Written by jane tims

September 16, 2013 at 7:10 am

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