nichepoetryandprose

poetry and prose about place

Posts Tagged ‘coast

walk on the shore

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2015 024_crop

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ignition

Sea-rocket (Cakile edentula Hook.)

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clumps of Sea-rocket

are splashes of lime on sand

missiles from lavender flowers

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pepper to tongue

pungent breath of Cakile

cardamom and caraway

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flavour our laughter

giggles of gulls cross sober sand

intervention in sluggish lives

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launches from Cape Canaveral

moon-walking on the beach

splash-downs in Sargasso Seas

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most days are moth-eaten –

paper cuts, missives, e-mails to answer

problems, resolutions without teeth

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the seawind smooths its sand

begs for someone to take a stick

scratch out a love song

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IMG444_crop

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Copyright 2015  Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

June 17, 2015 at 7:35 am

washday

with 12 comments

A few years ago, we took a vacation to les Îles de la Madeleines, also known as the Magdalen Islands, in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence and part of the Province of Quebec.  We loved the ferry rides to and from the Islands, the endless white sand beaches, the artisans, and the demonstrations of wind sailing.  Most of all, I loved the colourful houses.  I always planned to try to capture the beaches and those houses in a painting.  I finally completed my tryptic called ‘washday #1’, ‘washday #2’ and ‘washday #3’.

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June 9, 2015 'washday#1' Jane Tims

June 9, 2015 ‘washday#1’ Jane Tims

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June 9, 2015 'washday#2' Jane Tims

June 9, 2015 ‘washday#2’ Jane Tims

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June 9, 2015 'washday#3' Jane Tims

June 9, 2015 ‘washday#3’ Jane Tims

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And the three together:

June 9, 2015 'washday'  Jane Tims

June 9, 2015 ‘washday’ Jane Tims

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Copyright  2015  Jane Tims

harvesting colour – Sea Lavender

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Sea Lavender, picked long ago and woven into a wreath

Sea Lavender, picked long ago and woven into a wreath

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Sea Lavender

 

Limonium Nashii Small.

 

1.

 

bunch of lavender, dry

picked at the edge

of the sea

 

2.

 

at high tide, overcome

by salt water, linear

leaves buffeted

as rags, tattered purple papers

echoed in oil-slick

mirrors of foam

 

3.

 

on-shore breeze, stiff

sprays of Sea Lavender

tremble

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Published as ‘Sea Lavender’, Canadian Stories 17 (99),October/November 2014

Copyright  2014  Jane Tims

 

dry Sea Lavender

dry Sea Lavender


 

 

Written by jane tims

October 22, 2014 at 7:18 am

back to Cornwall

with 4 comments

Although I have done some stationary biking since I ended my virtual trip across northern New Brunswick, I want to get back to the regular schedule I followed when I biked virtually in France and Cornwall.  So I have decided to hop back on the Street View road and see some more of Cornwall.

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In Phase 7 of my virtual cycling, I finished the southern coast of Cornwall at Landewednack and Lizard.  I’ll begin Phase 9 at Predannack Wollas and cycle around the west coast of Cornwall.  I’ll look forward to seeing Arthur’s Titagel and Doc Martin’s Port Isaac.  Mostly, my knees will benefit from more regular exercise.

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Predannack Wollas to Porthleven

Predannack Wollas to Porthleven

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I have my first four days plotted and I start tomorrow.  Just for old time’s sake, here is one of my earlier paintings from southern Cornwall …

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November 26, 2013  'maple and oak near Helford'   Jane Tims

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Copyright  2014  Jane Tims

The Light Never Lies – A Guest Post from Francis Guenette

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I am so pleased to welcome a guest in this post.  Francis Guenette is a Canadian writer, the author of two books, ‘Disappearing in Plain Sight’ ( FriesenPress, 2013) and ‘The Light Never Lies’ (Huckleberry Haven Publishing, 2014).  When I read ‘Disappearing in Plain Sight’, I was drawn to the setting – Crater Lake, the cabins and the garden.  In this post, Frances writes about the setting, its origins and how the setting influences the story.  Welcome Frances! And thank you so much for your Crater Lake Series of books!

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The Light Never Lies - 3-D bookcoverTo begin – a synopsis of The Light Never Lies:

As circumstances spiral out of control, Lisa-Marie is desperate to return to Crater Lake. The young girl’s resolve is strengthened when she learns that Justin Roberts is headed there for a summer job at the local sawmill. Her sudden appearance causes turmoil. The mere sight of Lisa-Marie upsets the relationship Liam Collins has with trauma counsellor, Izzy Montgomery. All he wants to do is love Izzy, putter in the garden and mind the chickens. Bethany struggles with her own issues as Beulah hits a brick wall in her efforts to keep the organic bakery and her own life running smoothly. A native elder and a young boy who possesses a rare gift show up seeking family. A mystery writer arrives to rent the guest cabin and a former client returns looking for Izzy’s help. Life is never dull for those who live on the secluded shores of Crater Lake. Set against the backdrop of Northern Vancouver Island, The Light Never Lies is a story of heartbreaking need and desperate measures. People grapple with the loss of cherished ideals to discover that love comes through the unique family ties they create as they go.

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My first order of business is to extend many thanks to Jane for inviting me over to her blog. Jane thought it would be interesting to hear how architectural and garden elements of the setting for Disappearing in Plain Sight and The Light Never Lies contributed to the story.

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Write what you know. It’s a common sense piece of advice. After all, fiction writers have enough work in the making-things-up department. When I first envisioned writing a novel, it was because a group of characters had made a sudden appearance in my imagination. I always knew they would live in a rural setting, on the shores of a lake, some in elaborate cabins with expansive gardens and some in more rustic dwellings. Fiction mirroring reality – where I live is somewhere in the grandiose middle.

Guenette - Cabin from the Lake

I thought about my own home and a few cabins in the vicinity and from there I embellished, stretched and massaged the reality of these settings into a small community on the shores of a fictional place called Crater Lake.

I have lived on the shores of a lake, in a cabin, with a garden in the wilderness for over twenty years. I’ve walked the trails around this place so many times my feet have worn smooth my route. In many ways, it’s hard for me to separate my own environment from that of the books – except to stress that Crater Lake is fictional, Micah Camp is a product of my imagination, the characters likewise. The cabins and gardens described are all altered, sometimes to a grander scale, sometimes to include elements not present anywhere but in my imagination. I suspect many writers have gone through a similar process.

Guenette - Cabin

Living in a particular place shapes people. A rural, semi-isolated setting, homes that reflect local materials open to multiple views of lake, mountains and trees, gardens and small businesses carved out of wild landscapes – all of these factors make the characters in my books the people they are and dictate (to a degree) the situations they find themselves in.

Guenette - Garden in the Wilderness

I have a couple of anecdotes that illustrate well a juxtaposition of fiction and reality. A close friend who has never visited our lakeside home, read Disappearing in Plain Sight and she loved it. When her husband managed a quick visit last summer, he told me he would tell his wife that our cabin and the view were just like walking into the book. The view perhaps – the cabin not so close, but close enough to resonate.

I recently ran into a woman who borrowed one of my books from her daughter. She and her husband had bought some land out in the wild and were getting ready to build. She asked me it the architect Caleb used to design his cabin in Disappearing in Plain Sight was based on a real person. She shrugged and said, “Oh, I suppose that would be too much to ask, but I want a place like the one you described in that book.”

Guenette - Kitchen Deck

Here is a dichotomy, for sure. If you come and visit me, at first glance you will recognize, in broad brush strokes, the setting of Disappearing in Plain Sight and The Light Never Lies. But don’t go looking for more. You’ll only end up disappointed. It is in the fine details that fiction has taken off to soar away from the landing strip of reality.

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Guenette - Begonia and Hostas

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Francis Guenette - author photo

Francis Guenette has spent most of her life on the west coast of British Columbia. She lives with her husband and finds inspiration for writing in the beauty and drama of their lakeshore cabin and garden. She has a graduate degree in Counselling Psychology from the University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. She has worked as an educator, trauma counsellor and researcher. The Light Never Lies is her second novel. Francis blogs over at http://disappearinginplainsight.com  and maintains a Facebook author page. Please stop by and say hello.

The Light Never Lies - ebook cover - Francis L. Guenette

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00I8XKIDK

 

Written by jane tims

April 29, 2014 at 7:00 am

along the river (day 2)

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For many days of my virtual travel during Phase 8, I will be ‘biking’ along the north shore of New Brunswick.  At first, I will travel along the Restigouche River.  Then I will continue as the river opens into the Baie-des-Chaleurs.  Just across the water will be the distant hills of the Gaspé Peninsula of the Province of Quebec.

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Phase 8 waterways 2

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8-2

map showing distance travelled (map from Google Earth)

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8-2   January 5, 2014   35 minutes  3.0 km (Richardsville to south of McLeods)

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On day 2 of my travels, I followed the relatively straight road along the coast.  The houses in rural New Brunswick are usually arranged in small communities with houses in a linear pattern along the main road.  New Brunswick has a lot of Crown Land (about 48% of the area), arranged in large blocks.  As a result, communities (and the associated privately-owned land) are often separated by long stretches of largely forested Crown Land.  Crown Lands are not privately owned but are managed by Federal or Provincial Departments for the people of the Province.

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8-2 rural NB

a typical stretch of road along the north shore (image from Street View)

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Most of the communities along the northern shore of New Brunswick are French-speaking, so when I see people along the road, I will be able to practice my French, as I did in France.

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January 7, 2014  'Restigouche River and hills of Gaspe'   Jane Tims

January 7, 2014 ‘Restigouche River and the hills of Gaspe’ Jane Tims

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Have you ever travelled in New Brunswick?  If so, I hope you enjoyed your stay!

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Copyright  2014   Jane Tims

return to the shore (day 54 and 55)

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For a few days of my virtual travel along the Cornwall coast, I haven’t been seeing much of the coast.  This is because my route took me inland, to skirt the tributaries of the Helford River.  Now, though, I am travelling along the coast again.

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7-54 and 55

map showing distance travelled (map from Google Earth)

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7-54  December 4, 2013  35 minutes  3.0 km  (from Porthoustock to St. Keverne)

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This is the famous Lizard Coast, called, not for the serpentine rock in the area, or for any reptile, but after the Cornish word meaning ‘high court’ (Lys Ardh).  I have seen a few references to the Lizard, including this sign in St. Keverne …

7-55

sign showing a lizard in St. Keverne (image from Street View)

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7-55  December 6, 2013  35 minutes  3.0 km  (from St. Keverne to Coverack)

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I haven’t attempted many people in my paintings, but in the watercolour below, I tried to capture a couple of the many people I saw enjoying the walk along the coastal road in Coverack.  With artists’ licence, I paired two people who in real-life have likely never met one another !!!!

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December 10, 2013  'walking in Coverack'   Jane Tims

December 10, 2013 ‘walking in Coverack’ Jane Tims

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Copyright  2013  Jane Tims

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