nichepoetryandprose

poetry and prose about place

Posts Tagged ‘pencil drawing

Pileated Woodpecker excavations

with 5 comments

The Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus) is a common visitor in our yard. The size of the woodpecker and its triangular red crest are impossible to miss. The male also has a red stripe on the side of its face.

There is a big spruce tree in our grey woods where the Pileated Woodpecker loves to visit. The hole in the tree and the pile of woodchips below the hole say this woodpecker has been very busy.  The woodpeckers drill these holes to get insects.

On a drive to see the Smyth Covered Bridge near Hoyt, New Brunswick, we found a roadside tree with evidence of the Pileated Woodpecker’s industry.  The holes are almost a foot in length and deep enough to hide a hand.

~

~

~

To humans, the best forests may seem to be woods with healthy trees. To provide good habitat for the Pileated Woodpecker, a forest should have lots of dead and fallen trees, to provide food and nesting sites.

~

~

Copyright Jane Tims 2018

Written by jane tims

April 27, 2018 at 7:06 am

Celebrating bookstores and reading – Canadian Independent Bookstore Day

leave a comment »

On Saturday, April 28, 2018, I will be participating in Canadian Independent Bookstore Day at Westminster Books in Fredericton. I will be there to talk with you about my books in the Meniscus Science Fiction Series and sign copies.  I will be at the bookstore from 11:00 AM to noon. Hope to see you there!!!

Canadian Independent Bookstore Day is a day to celebrate the amazing independent bookstores in communities across Canada that develop and maintain a thriving book industry across the country. It is a day to go out into your community and enjoy the unique intersection of art, culture, business and opportunity that bookstores provide. Thanks to your participation, this event can continue to grow and thrive in the years to come. The purpose of Canadian Independent Bookstore Day is to show off the unique community spaces that bookstores create and was born from Authors For Indies.

Authors for Indies was a national grassroots movement in support of independent bookstores. It’s a day when authors take time to give back to the bookstores who support authors every day of the year by volunteering as guest booksellers. We meet and greet customers, recommend books, tell our friends and relatives to come to the store where we are working. Hundreds of authors across Canada have done this for the past three years. It’s been a national phenomenon. 

Jane

in the shelter of the covered bridge

leave a comment »

world of the covered bridge.jpg

May 12, 2012 'enter' Jane Tims.jpg~

in the shelter of the covered bridge

by Jane Spavold Tims

poetry with illustrations

Chapel Street Editions 2017

poems about plants and animals living in the vicinity of the covered bridge

~

SCB Cover

~

73 poems, 35 bridges, 21 illustrations

~

apples, Malone Bridge.jpg

~

From the Preface:

Where I live in rural New Brunswick, driving through a covered bridge is a daily occurrence. The sounds of the tires on the decking, the glimpses of river and sunlight between boards, the fun of seeing a family fishing and the sight of a groundhog carrying her kit across entryway of the bridge — these are touch-stones for my existence.

The inspiration for this book came in 2015, when my husband and I crossed the Patrick Owens Bridge on the Rusagonis Stream and startled a rabbit in the middle of the span. The rabbit raced through the bridge in front of the truck. I can still see the shadow of his long ears and the scurry of his feet. Since the incident occurred during the February 21, 2015 conjunction of Venus and Mars, with the sickle moon just above the planets, I thought of all the legends about the hare and the moon. This led to the poem “conjunction” and a question about what other plants and animals find shelter in or around our covered bridges in New Brunswick.

My husband and I carried out the field work for the book during 2015. We focused on covered bridges in the entire Saint John River Valley, but we also visited bridges in Charlotte and Westmorland Counties. Travelling around the province, visiting covered bridges and paying special attention to the nearby wild life, was an ideal way to spend a spring and summer in New Brunswick. Some bridges were easy to find, others a challenge. Each bridge contributed its own personality, history and component flora and fauna.

The covered bridge is endangered in New Brunswick. In 1900, there were about 400 covered bridges in the province. By 1944, there were only 320. In 1992, when Glen, Michael and I visited some of the bridges for Canada’s 125th birthday, there were 71. In 2017, as I write this, there are only 60 remaining. Vandalism, flood, accident, fire and age claim more bridges every few years.

~

… In 2018, there are 58 covered bridges remaining …

~

Book available from Chapel Street Editions

~

 

dry wind

French Village Bridge

Hammond River #2

 

the bridge leans, upriver

wind enters, a beer can

rolls on the deck

 

white butterflies obey

the valley breeze

navigate the scent of wild roses

 

avoid the dogs

cooling off in the river

the beach folk, sunning themselves

 

bracts of Yellow Rattle

and Silene, inflated bladders

dry as old boards

 

aspens tremble

a song sparrow stutters

a loose shingle rattles in wind

~

May 12, 2012 'enter' Jane Tims

drawing of the French Village Bridge 2015: ‘enter’

 ~

About the Author

Jane Spavold Tims is a botanist, writer and artist living in rural New Brunswick, Canada.  She has published two books of poetry, within easy reach (2106) and in the shelter of the covered bridge (2017), both with Chapel Street Editions, Woodstock. Her first four books in the Meniscus series, Meniscus: Crossing The Churn, Meniscus: One Point Five – Forty Missing Days, Meniscus: South from Sintha and Meniscus: Winter by the Water-climb, were published with CreateSpace in 2017 and 2018 under the name Alexandra Tims. In 2016 she won the Alfred G. Bailey Prize in the Writers’ Federation of New Brunswick Writing Competition for her manuscript of poems about bird calls. She is interested in identifying plants, bird-watching, science fiction and the conservation of built heritage. Her websites feature her drawings, paintings and poetry.

www.janetims.com

www.offplanet.blog

www.janetimsdotcom.wordpress.com

~

two poetry books

~

both books available from Chapel Street Editions

~

abandoned buildings

with 2 comments

We are living in a time when many of our older buildings are reaching the end of their useful lives. Old churches, old covered bridges, old schools and old houses are everywhere, facing the indignity of old age. So many succumb, end up in landfills or as rotting derelicts. Yet these are buildings where history whispers. Buildings with stories to tell, our stories.

~

~

abandoned church

~

highbush cranberry

first, fruit hard and green

then, red, ready for wine

then shriveled raisins

hang on a leafless vine

~

the wick of a candle stub

competes with cobwebs

for thickness, thin sunlight

oozes, amber glass, a saber

along the empty aisle

threatens motes

in stale air undisturbed

where stray wind never

finds its way

~

deconsecrated and so

not desecrated when mice

squeeze under the threshold

gnaw at the pulpit, or when

vines whisper

vague obscenities

at the lintel, tap on glass

~

stripped of cross and steeple

people, prayers

stained glass and benches

removed and sold at auction

mice pause at their industry

to assess ambiguous whispers

~

the young girl who sat on the stair

sang a song to her mother

the warden who argued to fix

the seep in the roof

the Minister

who stuttered

~

~

~

Copyright Jane Tims 2018

Written by jane tims

March 5, 2018 at 7:00 am

bird feeder visitors – personalities

with 2 comments

I put my feeders up late this year, but the birds have found them. So far the diversity is low, but the numbers are high. We have chickadees, goldfinches and nuthatches. I know from my bird diary of other years, redpolls, purple finches and blue jays will come later.

~

~

I spend a little time each day watching the birds. And, as in other years, I am amazed at how different are the  personalities of these birds.

~

~

Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) – sings ‘chick-a-dee-dee-dee’ or ‘fee-bee’ 

  •  the chickadee hoards food, storing food in times of plenty under bits of bark or a patch of lichen. Canada’s Hinterland Who’s Who says a chickadee can remember where it has stored its food up to 28 days.
  • the chickadee is a grab and go kind of feeder. They zoom in on a sunflower seed, pick it and leave.
  • chickadees hang out in flocks, and have a hierarchy and a ‘pecking order’. The birds are very aggressive with other birds, chasing away other chickadees, nuthatches and goldfinches.

~

~

Red-breasted-Nuthatch (Sitta Canadensis) – sings a nasal ‘yank-yank-yank’ over and over

  • the nuthatch walks head-downward after it lands and in Newfoundland is called the ‘upside-down bird’.
  • nuthatches are very solitary at the feeder and are easily chased away by chickadees.
  • they get-their-food-and-get-going, not hanging around even for a second.
  • nuthatches also hoard and hide food.
  • Hinterland Who’s Who says these birds carry tree pitch to build their nests!

~

~

American Goldfinch (Carduelis tristis)  – sings ‘perchickoree’ and flies in a series of hanging loops, potato chip, potato chip.

  • at this time of year goldfinches are dull olive-yellow.
  • they hang out at bird feeders, staying put until they are chased away. They arrive at feeders in flocks and feed quite happily side by side.
  • although they eat sunflower seeds, they seem to prefer thistle seed.
  • Hinterland Who’s Who says goldfinches go into feeding frenzies before snowstorms, putting on significant weight before times when seeds are scarce.

~

~

Do you feed the birds and what kinds of birds come to your feeders? Do they have distinct personalities?

~

Copyright 2018 Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

February 20, 2018 at 7:00 am

special book offer – in the shelter of the covered bridge

leave a comment »

To celebrate my reading at Odd Sundays yesterday, I am selling my book in the shelter of the covered bridge (Chapel Street Editions 2017) at the reduced price of $25 (including postage) from February 16, 2018 until February 28, 2018.  If you happen to live in my driving area (within 30 km of Oromocto or Fredericton, New Brunswick), the price for a hand-delivered book is $20.  Just email me at timstims@nbnet.nb.ca and we will arrange for payment and delivery.  

The book usually sells for $28 so this is a great deal if you love poetry, covered bridges or wild life.

~

in the shelter of the covered bridge is published by Chapel Street Editions (Woodstock) and includes over 70 poems about visits to 54 of New Brunswick’s covered bridges. The book is illustrated with my pencil drawings and has a foreword by Brian Atkinson, a well-known New Brunswick photographer.

~

“… A delightful blend of her poetry and drawings, as well as the natural and cultural history of this province …” Linda Hershey, Moncton Times-Transcript, Nov. 30, 2017, writing about in the shelter of the covered bridge

 

~

Copyright 2018 Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

February 19, 2018 at 7:00 am

Reading – Odd Sundays – and a special book offer

leave a comment »

On Sunday February 18 at 2:00 PM I will be one of two featured readers at Odd Sundays in Fredericton. Wayne Curtis, well-known New Brunswick author, is also featured!

~

Moores Mills Bridge near Sussex, north entrance, 2015

 

~

I will be reading from my new poetry book ‘in the shelter of the covered bridge’ (Chapel Street Editions, 2017). If you love covered bridges, you will enjoy my poems. Each one was written after a visit to a particular covered bridge and the poems feature the plants and animals (and humans) who look to the covered bridge for shelter. Some love stories among the lot, since we will be near to Valentine’s Day! The book features my poems and my pencil drawings of some of the plants and animals I encountered.

~

carving inside Moores Mills Bridge near Sussex

~

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

As a special deal associated with this event, you can get a copy of the book (which sells for $28) for $25, postage included. Just email me at timstims@nbnet.nb.ca and we will arrange for payment and delivery.  This offer last from today February 16, 2018 until February 28, 2018.

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

~

~

I hope if you are in the Fredericton area, you will come to hear me read. The event is at Corked on Regent Street in downtown Fredericton. Come and enjoy a beverage and the readings. You may win a book in the draw or decide to read your own work in the open mic segment of the program.

~

Moores Mills Bridge near Sussex, south entrance, 2015

~

Remember to email me and get your own copy of ‘in the shelter of the covered bridge’. Nice gift for someone who loves covered bridges.

~

Copyright 2018 Jane Tims

%d bloggers like this: