nichepoetryandprose

poetry and prose about place

Posts Tagged ‘river

in the shelter of the covered bridge – drip line

leave a comment »

DSCF7421_crop

clear and amber water of the South Oromocto River

~

~

Drip line

~

slices river into upstream

and down, opaque and transparent,

dead calm and riffle, dark and light.

As water and air are cut

by meniscus, erratic in rain,

as her voice slips past present tense,

concentric rings expand.  Three trout

~

and gravels, perpendicular

rocks, embedded in amber.  Rain

disconnects today from yesterday,

slips from the roof of the covered

bridge, slides from edge, corrugated

steel, sheet of rain, crosses river

linear, liminal, shore to shore.

~

~

Copyright  2015  Jane Tims

~

Bell Bridge, South Branch Oromocto River

Bell Bridge, South Branch Oromocto River

 

Written by jane tims

April 8, 2015 at 7:24 am

harvesting colour – Rough Bedstraw

with 4 comments

DSCF1846_CROP_CROP_crop

~

~

Rough Bedstraw

            Gallium asprellum Michx.

~

along the sleepy river

green shoreline, plumped and pillowed

rough bedstraw, river trick

~

river and shoreline beckon

you to bed down, settle down

get a little shut-eye, tough

stuff bedstraw, mattress thick

~

shoreline a bedroom, rough

bedstraw, green mattress, blue sky

bedspread, blue river tick

~

~

DSCF3710_crop2

orchard along the Saint John River

~

Published as ‘Rough Bedstraw, Canadian Stories 17 (99),October/November 2014

Copyright  2014  Jane Tims

 

Written by jane tims

October 24, 2014 at 7:01 am

ghost girl

with 15 comments

In Fredericton, there is a relatively famous road, called Waterloo Row.  It is famous for its beautiful old homes and is featured in the Canadian version of the game Monopoly.  For me, the road represents a favorite part of my former morning commute.

~

Especially in fog, Waterloo Row presents some lovely vignettes, including ghostly images of the St. John River, with the old bridge, now a footbridge, vanishing into the mist…

~

~

older homes, some of whom are reputed to be haunted…

~

~

and a bench along the river footpath, haunted by a young girl who sat there almost 34 years ago, considering her future…

~

~

I see her sitting there whenever I drive by.  On a cool evening in May of 1980, she drove there on her bicycle and watched the river for an hour, thinking about what her life would be.  In two months, she would marry, and her life would change in many ways.  She thought about this and wondered.

~

If I could talk to her, I could answer almost all her questions.  I could tell her about her marriage of (so far) 33 wonderful years.  I could tell her all about her future husband and amazing son.  I could tell her how relaxing it will be to be at home full-time after three decades of work.  And I could tell her – the river could never be as beautiful as the sight of our small pond with its stone bench and violet-studded lawn on this day at the end of May, 34 years later.

~

Copyright  2013  Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

May 28, 2014 at 8:12 am

a covered bridge – the Burpee Bridge, Queens County, New Brunswick

with 2 comments

Last weekend, driving home from Miramichi, we followed the Grand Lake Road.  It is mostly unpopulated, devoted to tree plantations and a preservation site for mature white pine.

~

Along the way, we stopped in at the Burpee Covered Bridge on the Gaspereau River near Gaspereau Forks, Queens County.  This bridge is listed as Gaspereau River #2 in the April 1992 pamphlet ’Covered Bridges in New Brunswick’ (no author indicated).   This means there was once another covered bridge crossing the Gaspereau River but it is now gone.

~

DSCF9613

~

The Burpee Bridge was built in 1913.  It is 167′ 9″ long with a span of  163′ 6″.   The roadway width is 14′ 8″, and the load limit is 8 t.   The maximum clearance is 3.9 meters.

The bridge is on a main road and the grounds on both sides of the river are nicely kept and mowed.  The bridge was named for the family living nearby in 1913.

Inside the bridge, there is a window, with a good view of the Gaspereau River, showing the exposed bedrock of the river banks.

~

DSCF9620

~

The rafters of the bridge are populated with swallows and their nests.  The swallows chirped at me and swooped in and out of the bridge while I was there.

~

I couldn’t find any carvings in the failing light, but the inside of the bridge is covered in graffiti.

~

DSCF9619

~

A lot of fluorescent paint has been used and it would be interesting to shine a black light inside the bridge … no doubt it would glow with spooky color …

~

DSCF9617

~

We didn’t visit this bridge in 1992 as part of our Covered Bridge Project for Canada’s 125th anniversary.  I am sorry we didn’t do more bridges that year … some are now gone, and it is interesting to compare the information for those that have survived.

~

This year, on July 27, the community plans a celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Burpee Bridge.  The bridge will be turned (temporarily) into a museum of photos and artifacts about the bridge and community.  Keeping our covered bridges in the eye of the community helps to preserve their heritage and value.  It also encourages sharing of the wonderful stories about the part these bridges have played in our communities and lives.

~

Copyright  2013  Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

July 15, 2013 at 7:00 am

a covered bridge – the Marven Bridge, Kings County, New Brunswick

with 9 comments

In late June, we drove to Sussex to do some errands.  On the way back, we drove off the highway to find the covered bridge over the Belleisle Creek (Kings County).  This bridge is known as the Marven Bridge and is listed as Belleisle Creek #2 in the April 1992 pamphlet ’Covered Bridges in New Brunswick’ (no author indicated).   This means there was once another covered bridge crossing the Belleisle Creek but it is now gone.

The Marven Bridge was built in 1903.  It is 79′ long with a span of  71′.   The roadway width is 15′ 8″, and the load limit is 10 t.   The maximum clearance is 15′ 8″.

The bridge is on a relatively good road in a steep valley.  The blackberries were blooming in profusion along the road near the entryway to the bridge.

Inside the bridge, there is damage to the window openings where boards have been kicked out beside and below the windows.  Otherwise the bridge is in good condition.  We didn’t stop to look at carvings inside the bridge, but I saw a lot of graffiti as we crossed, including a giant ‘2012’.

We didn’t visit this bridge in 1992 as part of our Covered Bridge Project for Canada’s 125th anniversary.  However, my husband remembers going fishing there many years ago.

I was disappointed to discover we did not bring the camera on this drive, but I did a quick sketch on site and a painting when we arrived home.  I hope you like it!!!

~

IMG647_crop

June 26, 2013 ‘Marven Covered Bridge, Kings County’ Jane Tims

~

Copyright  Jane Tims  2013

Written by jane tims

July 10, 2013 at 7:07 am

keeping watch for dragons #5– river dragon

with 8 comments

It’s like getting an old song stuck in your head… I am now seeing dragons… everywhere.

Yesturday, as I crossed the bridge on the way to my work, I saw the piers of the old bridge and their reflections in the water.  To me they were the protruding plates along the spine of a river dragon, resting in the water.

Have you seen any dragons lately?

~

~

river dragon

~

eight bevelled piers

(only remains of the old bridge)

idle in still water, reflections rigid

plates along the spine of a spent dragon

lolling on his side

taking a break in the river

~

~

©  Jane Tims  2012

Written by jane tims

April 21, 2012 at 8:02 am

a moment of beautiful – trees and shadows

with 14 comments

space: edge of the St. John River in winter

beautiful: mature silver maple trees and their shadows on the snow

~

We went for a drive last weekend, along the St. John River.  Above the ice, the river is covered in snow, a broad white plain edged by very old and very rugged silver maple trees.

In spite of a harsh environment, these trees endure.  Each spring and fall, they are flooded.  They are scoured by ice and subject to the eroding forces of the river. They are always at risk from people searching for a supply of firewood.   A friend tells me these huge trees are usually suckers, grown from the base after the original tree was harvested.

And yet they grow old, a part of the hardwood floodplain forest.  On a sunny day, they lean over the snow-covered river and spread their shadows across its surface.  They have the beauty of their symmetry, solidity, grace, and fortitude.

~

the line of animal tracks crossing the snow are probably from a Red Fox

Copyright  Jane Tims  2012

%d bloggers like this: