nichepoetryandprose

poetry and prose about place

Posts Tagged ‘green

Wolf River apple

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Wolf River Apple

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branch broken

tree lacking proper

care and pruning

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bee burdened

pink with blossoming

pollination

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apple swells

the skin smooth, palest

lime and rosy

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picked unripe

to escape worms, deer

and apple fall

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Copyright Jane Tims 2015

Written by jane tims

August 10, 2015 at 8:30 pm

small green world

with 9 comments

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As I gradually put away my Christmas decorations, I am a little sad about disassembling the vignettes I created –  a group of carolers skating on a mirror pond, a serene stable scene, a lighted Christmas village.

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To see me through the rest of winter I have created another small world in a glass cloche, a moss and lichen garden under glass.  I picked the moss before the first December snow and it has done well for a month.  The moss leaves are bright and there is new growth on some of the lichen tips.  The terrarium even has its own little climate and ‘weather’ – days when the glass is clear and dry, and days when the glass is foggy and you can see a faint mist among the mosses.

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I love the ‘green-ness’ of this miniature world.  Green mosses, sheltered by the green leaves of my Lipstick Vine (Aeschynanthus lobbianus) and guarded by my green, four-clawed Chinese dragon.  Green candles.

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While the world outside is cold and white, I have this tiny green world to remind me – spring is only weeks away.

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072_crop

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Copyright 2015  Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

January 5, 2015 at 7:14 am

green flame

with 4 comments

20141208-154015.jpg
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In the afternoon, on a sunny day, the light from the stained glass window in our stairwell finds a place on the wall of our living room. For a few moments, blues, reds and greens create a gorgeous splash of colour. Yesterday afternoon, the spotlight settled behind the curtained door to the library. And a green flame shimmered among the folds of fabric, a reminder of the greenery slumbering out in the yard, beneath the snow.
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Copyright 2014 Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

December 10, 2014 at 7:15 am

harvesting colour – the vegetable stand

with 2 comments

Gardens are bursting with fresh produce and we have gone to the farmer’s vegetable stand every couple of days to get our fill of locally grown food.  We usually look for new potatoes, yellow wax beans, beets, carrots, green onions and zucchini.

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vegetables at the farmer's stand

vegetables at the farmer’s stand

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This year, as a result of my ‘harvesting colour’ project, I am more anxious than ever to collect those carrot tops and the abundant leaves of beet and radish.  Cooking these leaves in my dyeing ‘cauldron’ fills the air with the savory smell of vegetable soup, and makes me wonder what colour will emerge from the dye pot.

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beet leaves and stems ready for the boil

beet leaves and stems ready for the boil

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Orange carrots, red beets and scarlet radishes … I am sad to say my expectations were low.  I was certain every batch of leaves would yield yet another shade of brown. For radishes and beets, I was correct.  Beautiful browns.

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my hand-spun balls of wool from radish and beet leaves ... the pink is from my earlier tests with pickled beets

my hand-spun balls of wool from radish and beet leaves … the pink is from my earlier tests with pickled beets

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Imagine my delight when the carrot leaves yielded a bright celery green!

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dye and wool roving from a boil of carrot tops

dye and wool roving from a boil of carrot tops

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I tried to repeat the colour on a second length of wool roving, but the second simmering gave me a gold shade of brown.   The dyestuff had offered up all its green colour in the first boil!

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colours of wool obtained from the first and second boil in a dyestuff of carrot tops

colours of wool obtained from the first and second boil in a dyestuff of carrot tops

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vegetable bin

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most look for

vitamins and

anti-oxidants

seek the colourful plate

look at the farmer’s display and see

carrot orange

radish red

spinach green

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a dyer looks

for juicy leaves

and the possibility of yet

another shade

of brown

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Copyright  2014  Jane Tims   

Written by jane tims

August 13, 2014 at 7:13 am

an attempt at ecoprinting

with 6 comments

After our drive to Canterbury over the weekend, I was anxious to capture some of the roadside flower colour in my ‘harvesting colour’ experiments.  I decided to try a technique described by India Flint in her book Eco Colour: Botanical Dyes for Beautiful Textiles (Interweave Press, 2010).  ‘Ecoprinting’ involves bringing a plant into close contact with a fabric  in order to transfer the colour to the cloth.  I am very impressed with the effects shown in Eco Colour – prints of leaves, flowers and berries.

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For my experiment I tried a handful of the Forget-me-nots I collected on our weekend drive …

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Forget-me-nots in the woods

Forget-me-nots in the woods

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a bundle of the purple Lupins growing along the road in my community …

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Lupins along the road

Lupins along the road

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and a bunch of a ground cover plant growing in my yard, Bugleweed (Ajuga reptans) …

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Bugleweed in the orchard

Bugleweed in the orchard

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basket of Bugleweed

basket of Bugleweed

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I only used small samples of cloth … my idea is to use these ‘patches’ to make a little quilt to show the results of my ‘colour harvest’.  I arranged a few of the flowers, both petals and leaves, inside the cloth  …

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Forget-me-nots on cotton

Forget-me-nots on cotton

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Lupin petals and leaves on cotton

Lupin petals and leaves on cotton

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Bugleweed on cotton

Bugleweed on cotton

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Then I folded the cloth in half, enclosing the flowers like a sandwich …

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flowers folded in cotton

flowers folded in cotton

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and rolled the cloth up tightly …

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rolling the bundle tightly

rolling the bundle tightly

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and tied it with cotton thread …

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flower and cotton bundles

flower and cotton bundles

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I put my bundles in a wire basket and steamed them for an hour …

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flower and cotton bundles steaming  (as usual I have thrown in a bit of woods and sky)

flower and cotton bundles steaming (as usual I have thrown in a bit of woods and sky)

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After cooling, I opened the bundles, discarded the leaves and flowers, and rinsed the cloth.  I was quite pleased with the results.  After ironing, I have a pale array of colour.  The Bugleweed left a definite lime green.  The Lupin a more indefinite green and pale violet.  The Forget-me-nots left a faint violet-grey.

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pale colour

pale colour

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I did not get the flower and leaf impressions I expected, but I will keep trying.  There are so many variables, steaming time and ‘unbundling’ time among them.  I do hope to see that lovely lime green again!!!

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Copyright  2014  Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

June 20, 2014 at 7:17 am

a moment of beautiful – a button of moss

with 32 comments

the space: at ground level, in the grey woods

the beautiful: a little button of moss, emerald green

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Mosses are a beautiful, enigmatic group of plants.  Except for a few well-known species, they simply grow unnamed and unnoticed by most people.  The beauty of the mosses, especially under the stereo-microscope, where you can see so much detail,  was what attracted me to the study of botany in the first place.

We have many species of moss in our Grey Woods.  I long to be able to take the time to identify every one.  For now, though, I content myself with a few common names and some of my own ‘made-up’ names.

I call this little moss ‘The Button’.  Wherever I find it, it seems to grow in a little cushion.  Its surface is like velvet and its color is a lovely shade of lime green.

 

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a button to press

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resist the urge

to depress this plump of moss

firmly with a finger

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will take you up

to the first floor

where the bunchberry blooms

or the second where bracken

planks an ephemeral floor

or the 67th where leaves align

precisely with sun

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or down

to where the roots criss-cross

in confused abandon

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©  Jane Tims  2012

Written by jane tims

June 9, 2012 at 9:15 am

a moment of beautiful – traffic lights

with 8 comments

the space:  above the roadway, at an intersection, in the fog

the beautiful:  green, yellow and red traffic lights, seeming to hover, like jewels in the fog

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Traffic lights!!! Beautiful???  Perhaps you will never agree.  But I think those lights, when seen on a foggy day, suspended as if from the sky itself, are as beautiful as jewels.  Emerald, topaz and ruby.

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Copyright Jane Tims 2012

Written by jane tims

March 14, 2012 at 6:50 am

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