nichepoetryandprose

poetry and prose about place

Posts Tagged ‘pink

harvesting colour – blackberry red and pink

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Autumn is officially here; summer up and left last week.  My complaints are suddenly of chilly evenings, not too-warm nights!  But with this season comes a series of dyeing projects I have been looking forward to – dyeing with berries and autumn leaves.

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berries harvested at our cabin in 2013

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At our summer property, we have blackberries in profusion.  They ripen slowly over a period of three weeks and we eat our fill.  This year I decided to sacrifice a few for the dye pot.

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Dyeing with berries is easy.  I brought three cups of berries to a simmer in three liters of water for about an hour.  The strained liquid was a bright red, the colour of ripe cranberries …

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dye from blackberries

dye from blackberries

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I dyed alum-treated wool with a slow simmer and an overnight soak.  The result was a pale pink, a welcome addition to my collection of ‘mostly brown’ …

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pink wool dyed with blackberries is front and center ... other wools are dyed with (clockwise) oak, meadowsweet, bugleweed, tansy, lily-of-the-valley, beet root, and in the center, carrot tops

pink wool dyed with blackberries is front and center … other wools are dyed with (clockwise) oak (dark brown), meadowsweet (orange), bugleweed (brown), tansy (gold), lily-of-the-valley (grey), and beet root (deep pink), and in the center, carrot tops (green)

 

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I also tried dying linen and cotton with the blackberry dye, and these gave me the burgundy I had hoped for …

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back left to front: wool, linen, cotton and another cotton, dyed with blackberries

back left to front: wool, linen, cotton and another cotton, dyed with blackberries

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I think I will be using the pink/burgundy cotton as the backing for the small ‘harvesting colour’ quilt I plan to make.  I’ll hem the linen and use it in my kitchen.

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March 18, 2012 ‘blackberries’ Jane Tims

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Copyright 2014  Jane Tims

 

Written by jane tims

September 24, 2014 at 7:32 am

beet pink

with 4 comments

Last week, I tried dyeing some wool roving with the juice of pickled beets …

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Yesterday I opened the jar and rinsed the wool in cool water.  Looks like a lot of the colour still went down the drain …

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And the final result?  A pretty pink.  Reminds me of the pink batts of insulation we installed in our walls! The wool is not scratchy at all, but soft and fragrant.

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Gradually I am building a rainbow of colour on my drying rack …

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from right to left: wool roving prepared with alum as a mordant; wool dyed with Tansy; wool dyed with Old Man’s Beard lichen; and wool dyed with pickled beet juice

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I am still working on the poem to capture this experience … it’s not quite ready to share.

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Copyright  2014  Jane Tims

 

Written by jane tims

May 9, 2014 at 10:34 am

excusing the difference

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On this cold and wintry day …

along the Atlantic coast

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When my son went to school, we often went to theatrical presentations at the school.  The young people were so talented and the presentations so well executed, I often went away with the lines of a poem running through my head.

One evening performance was particularly memorable and inspiring.  It was a production of Romeo and Juliet, and in this ‘version’ Rosaline was given an on-stage role.  Rosaline is the character who does not appear in Shakespeare’s play but has a background role as Romeo’s first love.

The young lady who played the part of Rosaline was memorable for her costuming and her on-stage presence.  She was dressed entirely in black Goth except for her hair – bright pink.  I remember her soliloquy – she begged us to look past her difference and see the person within.

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pink roses

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heroine

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her hair

a stroke of pink

on the brown audience

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more compelling

than the script

or the decorated stage

not surprising to see her name

on the program

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Rose

in the part of Rosaline

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in black but for the hair

even her lips

implore the audience

to pardon the difference

to understand

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if only he had lived

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she, of course, the heroic one

not Romeo

or Juliet

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not the dead

but the left-behind

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last rose

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Copyright  2014  Jane Tims

Written by jane tims

January 29, 2014 at 9:17 am

keeping watch for dragons #7 – Bog Dragon

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Some dragons like to live in bogs.

When we were in Nova Scotia, near Peggy’s Cove, imagine my delight when I found, among the Pitcher-plants, a species of the orchid family, Arethusa (Arethusa bulbosa L.), also known as the Dragon’s Mouth Orchid.

Arethusa loves wet, boggy conditions.  Among the greens and reds of the low-lying bog, it surprises a visitor with its splash of pink.  Even the Pitcher-plants in the photo above look a little over-come with the beauty of the Dragon’s Mouth!

This orchid has a complex flower, with three thin flaring upper petals, two in-turned petals guarding its ‘mouth’ and a lower lip with yellow and white fringed crests.

Arethusa is named after a Naiad in Greek mythology.  The Naiads were nymphs associated with fresh water features such as springs, wells, fountains and brooks.  Nymphs, like plants, were dependant on their habitat… if the water where they lived dried up, they perished.

Perhaps a Bog Dragon is also absolutely dependant on the water held within the bog!!!

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Bog Dragon

         Arethusa bulbosa L.

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naiad

masquerades as dragon,

claps her hands across her mouth,

sorry to have spoken –

her voice, her pink, her petals

lure them,

their large feet and tugging hands

too near

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©  Jane Tims  2012

Written by jane tims

July 14, 2012 at 8:36 am

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