nichepoetryandprose

poetry and prose about place

limits of the tide #3 – Sea-blite (Sueda maritima (L.) Dumort.)

with 2 comments


Another edible coastal plant is Sea-blite (Sueda maritima (L.) Dumort.).  Sea-blite is a low-growing plant, often forming mats on the shore.   Sea-blite can also be found at inland locations, near salt springs.

Sea-blite has thick, linear leaves.  The flowers are small and fleshy, and grow in the axils of the stem.  At this time of year, Sea-blite is still a small, inconspicuous plant.  Later it will grow to between 3 and 5 dm.

The leaves of Sea-blite are very salty, and can be used as a source of salt in soup or stew, or an ingredient in salads.   Used as a pot-herb, they should be cooked for 10 to 12 minutes in two to three changes of boiling water, to reduce the salt content.

Warning:
1. never eat any plant if you are not absolutely certain of the identification;
2. never eat any plant if you have personal sensitivities, including allergies, to certain plants or their derivatives;
3. never eat any plant unless you have checked several sources to verify the edibility of the plant.

~

~

persuasion

               Sea-blite (Sueda maritima (L.) Dumort.)

~

fingers of Sea-blite

poke the salt air,

rebuke the salt sea

crave attention –

pick me!  pick me!!

~

fingers of Sea-blite

point politely at the pot

propose, diplomatically,

add a little more salt

~

~

©  Jane Tims  2012

Written by jane tims

June 29, 2012 at 7:00 am

2 Responses

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  1. I love your poem – it gives a little personality to plain little plant!

    Like

    Barbara Rodgers

    June 29, 2012 at 6:11 pm


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