nichepoetryandprose

poetry and prose about place

On moonlight bay

with 4 comments

Another of my watercolours …

~

~

All my best,

Jane

Written by jane tims

March 23, 2020 at 7:00 am

Posted in Uncategorized

a quilting story: lemons and lemonade

leave a comment »

I am going to share the long, twisty story of my poppy quilt.

~

First, I am not a great quilter, but I have made many quilts. To illustrate, a friend once asked if I was ‘basting’ the quilt together first. I was not; I just quilt with long, uneven stitches.

~

The story begins last Christmas when I ordered, on-line, a draft-stopper made from a row of stuffed sheep. It was adorable, well-constructed and perfect.

~

So this Christmas I decided a cute lap-quilt with a sheep motif would be nice for the easy chair near the draft-stopper. So I looked on-line and ordered this cute little quilt.

~

~

Something went wrong with the order (I think I ordered from a knock-off site) and when the quilt arrived I was beyond disappointed. Someone had taken a photo of the above quilt or one like it, had it printed on rayon fabric and sewed the ‘quilt’ together with a machine stitch.

~

~

Meanwhile, I was planning to make a small quilt for our bedroom which is decorated with a poppy motif. I had some of the fabric, left over from other projects. I looked on- line and found the perfect fabric, in ready-to-quilt 5″ by 5″ squares. 42 squares, just enough for my quilt. Disappointment number 2. The fabric, when it arrived was beautiful. But, only 8 of the 42 squares were in the poppy motif! Grrrrr.

~

So I said, dang the price and sent for another 42 (that is 8) squares. Now I still had to purchase a padding for the quilt. Hmmm. I have that ugly sheep quilt.

~

So I used the sheep quilt for the backing, sewing individual poppy squares over the sheep in rows. Very pretty although the colours are probably the result of my flower-child years.

~

~

Once I had the top completed, I sent for some fabric to do the underside. The first order was cancelled because the fabric did not print correctly, but, frustration aside, the final fabric is soft and beautiful. You can see my ‘basting’ stitches if you look closely!

~

~

Now I will do a wide band for the edges, this time in a bright California poppy fabric. My quilt will be colourful and warm, and, somewhere within the layers of fabric, sleep 25 ugly sheep!

~

~

All my best and may your quilting projects be without frustration!

Jane

Written by jane tims

March 20, 2020 at 7:00 am

watching you …

leave a comment »

A couple of years ago, I did a set of five small acrylic paintings to reflect my love of mythical dragons.

~

Dragons can be nasty creatures. They hoard gold, breathe fire and frighten the villagers. But they have a good side. They provide hours of entertainment, they helped explain comets in the skies for centuries and they have soulful eyes!

~

~

Just to say, there is some good in every situation.

~

All my best,

Jane

Written by jane tims

March 18, 2020 at 7:00 am

Posted in myth and mystery

Tagged with , , ,

Ball’s Bridge’

leave a comment »

In southern Ontario, the Maitland River winds through fields and woodlands before it empties into Lake Huron at Goderich.

DSCN0110.JPG

When we visited the area two summers ago, we discovered the Ball’s Bridge on the Little Lakes Road.

~

DSCN0105 (1).JPG

~

Ball’s bridge was built over the Maitland River in 1885. It is a rare example of a two-span pin-connected Pratt through-truss iron bridge and one of the oldest wrought-iron Pratt bridges in the US and Canada. The bridge was built at a time when horse-drawn carriages and carts were its only traffic. In 2006 the bridge was declared unsafe for the weight of modern vehicles. In 2008, the bridge was saved from further deterioration and eventual destruction by the Friends of Ball’s Bridge.

~

DSCN0115 (1).JPG

~

DSCN0111 (1).JPG

The poem below tries to capture the interplay of light and shadow as we crossed Ball’s Bridge and drove the local roads.

~

Ball’s Bridge, Maitland River

~

on the first day of fall

landscape is criss-crossed

in lattice and wire

spider web and the flight paths

of pigeon-flutter

to the high lines

of the iron bridge

~

rays of light

find solar panels

and the backs of turtles

sunning on river logs

the inter-lacing

of dark water and light

the shadows of metal and truss

intercepting wire

~

cornfields

and winter wheat

embedded rows

a river and its valley

and a hawk follows

panels of air, first frost

and meltwater collects

on oval lily pads

yellowed leaves

rusted wire

~

~

This is the second metal bridge we have visited in Ontario. A few years ago we photographed the South Nation River Bridge, in Glengarry County, not far from Cornwall. That bridge has been removed, another loss from our built landscape. For the story of our visit to the South Nation River metal bridge click here

~

All my best,

Jane Tims

 

 

Written by jane tims

March 16, 2020 at 7:00 am

Watercolour lessons #3

with 6 comments

If you are staying at home more than usual in the coming weeks, I hope you have an interest to pursue, one to relax and involve you.

~

I have been taking watercolour painting lessons. As part of our recent practice of self-isolation, the lessons themselves have been postponed. But, with what I have learned, I can practice and enjoy what I find very relaxing. There is something calming about watching the colour flow from the brush to the paper, especially when using the wet on wet technique (paper is wetted prior to adding colour).

~

This afternoon I painted two studies of the Teton mountains which we visited in 2001 (totally from memory). I thought the first painting could use improvement, especially with respect to the trees on the right side and the water in the lower half of the painting. Actually, I don’t think painting 2 is an improvement. Copying watercolour is more difficult since the paint has a mind of its own. Also, the second painting lacks the spontaneity of the first.

~

~

~

As a result of this post, I give you two possible activities to help you during isolation:

1. have a look at the two and tell me which you think is best and in what respects.

2. pick up the tools for an activity you love and spend some time doing.

~

We are a social species. Although social-distancing and self-isolation are different for us, we are also a thinking species. We can understand that success against the coronavirus requires a community response. I have faith that we will soon be able to return to our normal activities.

~

All my best,

Jane

Written by jane tims

March 15, 2020 at 5:03 pm

‘Something the Sundial Said’ — a new cozy mystery

leave a comment »

Now available in paperback and ebook on Amazon – the next book in the Kaye Eliot Mystery Series: ‘Something the Sundial Said.‘ This book follows the adventures of Kaye and her family after they buy a new house in rural Nova Scotia.

~

sundial and lupins paperback

~

In 1995, Kaye and her young family attend a country auction, never dreaming the stone sundial in the garden is the site of a century-old murder. They end up buying the house and property but someone else buys the sundial. Then Kaye finds a diary written in 1880, chronicling the days leading up to the murder.

When Kaye reads the diary, she decides to search for the sundial and return it to the property. And she follows clues in the diary to discover who shot Rodney in the sundial garden.

At every corner, she is outmaneuvered by a local genealogist who is anxious to obtain the diary and keep information damaging to her family hidden. The woman will go to ridiculous lengths to obtain the diary, even stalking Katie, Kaye’s teenaged daughter. As Kaye discovers someone is entering her house at night to find the diary, she wonders who she can trust.

~

If you love cozy mysteries, this book is for you!

To get your copy of the book, click here.

For people in the Fredericton area, I will be launching the book in April.

~

cover SSS scaled

~

All my best,

Jane

https://www.amazon.com/Something-Sundial-Said-Eliot-Mysteries/dp/1700091344

Written by jane tims

March 10, 2020 at 2:43 pm

Watercolour lessons # 2

leave a comment »

In week four of the watercolour course I am taking, we are using the techniques we have learned to paint landscapes.

~

First, we were asked to find an image/photo we like. I chose a scene from our cabin property, a photo of the lake through the trees, in late fall. It offered near and distant views and the colour palette I wanted to work with.

~

lake at camp

~

Then, we planned the painting, either visualizing the final presentation or actually sketching the landscape in pencil. I skipped the pencil because I love to draw and I guessed the end would be a full-blown pencil drawing.

~

in the painting, I also wanted to try a technique I have seen on Pinterest. Canadian artist Holly Anne Friezen’s paintings of forest sometimes interpret the jumble of leaves in the canopy as stained glass, and I have wanted to try this for some time. Other artists have also used this technique.

~

Scan_20200309 (4)

~

To do the painting, I took the work in stages:

  1. I used painter’s tape to mark the locations of the main trees. This way, I could concentrate on the background without worrying about painting the trees.
  2. I painted the background sky, lake and far shore using a wet on wet technique.
  3. I painted the forest floor of the near shore using the colours of the fall.
  4. I removed the tape and painted two types of trees, the mountain birch and the red maples that live along the lake shore.
  5. I switched to a fine brush, to paint the many branches of the trees. For the colour, I used some black, but also created dark grey by mixing the complimentary colours red and green, or orange and blue. I tried to criss-cross the branches so I would have many triangles and odd-shaped shapes to use for the stained-glass part of the work.
  6. After the paint was completely dry, I used orange, red, purple, yellow and green to colour the ‘stained glass’ shapes.

~

I loved the result so much, I did three paintings. In my opinion, the third painting is the best.

~

Scan_20200309 (6)

~

Scan_20200309

~

In retrospect, I would have created more transparent, pure colour in the ‘stained-glass’ by not painting the sky, lake and far shore under the areas where I wanted to paint the ‘stained-glass.’

~

I don’t always frame and hang my paintings, but I like these so much, I am going to find a place for them in my home.

All my best,

Jane

Written by jane tims

March 9, 2020 at 10:19 pm

%d bloggers like this: