nichepoetryandprose

poetry and prose about place

Posts Tagged ‘fences

fencing us in (day 19 and 20)

with 8 comments

When I first moved to New Brunswick, rail fences could be seen almost everywhere in rural areas.  The design was simple – stacks of very long cedar logs in a zigzag without posts at the junction. The logs were piled from 3 to 4 high and were very weathered.  These fences used cedar in the construction because of its natural ability to withstand rot.

~

As the years go by, these fences have gradually disappeared from the landscape.  Part of this is because the fences eventually deteriorate.  Also, people salvage the rails for landscaping and other projects.

~

19-20

distance travelled (map from Google Earth)

~

8-19  February 25, 2014   30 minutes  (Petit-Rocher-Nord to Petit-Rocher)

8-20   February 27, 2014   30 minutes (Petit-Rocher to Petit-Rocher-Sud)

~

Although I haven’t seen the zigzag style of rail fence on my virtual bike trip along the northern New Brunswick coast, I have seen other rail fence designs.  These fences are also built of cedar, but the rails are supported at the junctions by short lengths of cedar …

~

rail fence Nash Creek

rail fence near Nash Creek (image from Street View)

~

or on a sort of ladder, consisting of two posts and cross-members …

~

rail fence Pointe verte

rail fence near Pointe Verte (image from Street View)

~

When I was younger, sitting on a fence like any of these was on my list of favorite things to do.  Today, our property is fenced with a zigzag style cedar rail fence, built by my husband who is proud to say not a nail is used in the construction …

~

nailess rail fence round our property

zigzag rail fence round our property

~

I wonder if there are nails used in this rail fence …

~

March 5, 2014  'rail fence'  Jane Tims

March 5, 2014 ‘rail fence’ Jane Tims

~

Copyright 2014 Jane Tims

walls, fences and gates 5-7

with 10 comments

~

hedge in Le Treuil Arnaudeau

hedge in Le Treuil Arnaudeau (image from Street View)

~

Day 5-7 1 Logbook

~

Day 5-7 1 map

map showing distance travelled (map from Google Maps)

~

As I continue my virtual cycling through France,  I am thinking about how differently people indicate their property boundaries in New Brunswick and France.  In the Street View images of France, fences, hedges, walls and gates are the norm …

~

5-7 l

various walls, hedges and gates in Le Treuil Arnaudeau (image from Street View)

~

In New Brunswick, there are occasional fences and some hedges, but usually properties are left quite open and accessible …

~

5-7 new brunswick

street in Fredericton Junction, New Brunswick (image from Street View)

~

As I ‘cycle’ along in France, I have the impression that the French must be private people.  I think I would find opening a gate to get to the front door of a house quite intimidating …

~

gates for cars and people

gates for cars and people – note the small shrine in the nook in the stone wall (image from Street View)

~

Barriers serve many purpose, of course:

  • they improve security, creating a barrier to intruders
  • they can be used to keep pets inside, or to keep children away from the road
  • they can keep pests out of gardens (bad bunnies, for example)
  • they usually add visual appeal to a property
  • they mark property boundaries, preventing disputes with neighbors

~

The high wall around the church yard in Montroy encloses a large cemetery ….

~

church in Montroy

wall around the cemetery and church in Montroy (image from Street View)

~

Hedges, fences and walls also limit the visual intrusion of the outside world and create spaces where people can feel comfortable …

~

walled spaces

creating private space with vegetation, walls and gates (image from Street View)

~

I think barriers are an element of culture.  People who are used to seeing fences come to expect them in the landscape.  Fences and walls are also perceived differently by different cultures.  Because I am not used to gates, I might be quite hesitant to open one in order to say hello to the property owner.  However, someone who is familiar with walls and fences would probably open a gate without a second thought.

~

Best View: a stone wall in Fontpatour.  The mason who laid the stones took such care with his work.  The corner stones create a strong framework and the small stones are in groups, interspersed with larger stone …

~

'corner stones'

~

Copyright  Jane Tims  2013

Written by jane tims

May 27, 2013 at 7:09 am

%d bloggers like this: