nichepoetryandprose

poetry and prose about place

the stone between farms

with 2 comments


How do you show the boundary line between you and your neighbor? 

At Ågersta Village in Uppland, Sweden, is a rune stone positioned to mark a boundary between two properties.  The stone is carved with two serpent creatures entwined, their heads in profile.  Each has two sets of legs, the forelegs strong, and the rear legs weak and helpless. 

The stone was carved by Balle, a frequent carver of rune stones in Sweden, and raised by Vidhugse, in memory of his father.  The boundry, established in the twelfth century, showed the boudary until 1856 when the property lines were finally changed!

The inscription reads, in part: Hiær mun standa stæinn miđli byia – “Here shall stand the stone between farms.”

from my imagination and not the rune stone at Ågersta Village

 

 

stone between farms

            (rune stone in Ågersta Village, Uppland)

                                                                      Do not move your neighbor’s boundary stone…

                                                                                                                      – Deuteronomy 19:14

~

ninth morning already

irate I rise

gather my tools

trudge to the hillside

~

stone waits for me, Balle

(master carver of runes)

shadows pulled into dragon

compete with guidelines

‘what is not’ more complete than ‘what is’

~

another fair day

Vidhugse to the west and south

Austmadr to the east 

surely their bickering over boundaries

will cease

~

by noon the sun

embroils the rock

streaks my brow with sweat

floods the serpent creature’s clever eye

lip lappets drip

~

mosquitoes dither about

the creature’s profile acquires

the look of an insect head

reckless slip of the rune tool

could end its smirk

~

hill of rock dust

settles on my shoe

birches stir the air

odor of leaf layer

memory smell of Birka

~

© Jane Tims 2005

Written by jane tims

October 8, 2011 at 6:49 am

2 Responses

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  1. Red pins, marked and surveyed 😉 That was the answer to your question BTW

    Interesting way to mark boundary lines.

    Really like the middle verse Jane.

    ~Denis

    Like

    JD

    October 10, 2011 at 9:20 am

    • Hi. And red marks and slashes on trees! Thanks for the comment. This poem was quite a bit of fun to write. Jane

      Like

      jane tims

      October 10, 2011 at 6:06 pm


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